Girls wrestling
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Vista Ridge wrestlers Grace Lee, left, Angel Norman, Bella Mitchell and Kai Morrison stand beside the mat Saturday during the Vista Ridge High School tourney in Colorado Springs.

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Unified bowling, girls’ wrestling and boys’ volleyball are one step closer to sanctioning after pilot seasons were approved by equity committee.

The equity committee looks at a number of different factors which would affect each school if the sports were sanctioned, and reviews the impact to proportionality and Title IX considerations.

The sports must be reviewed by two more committees, the Colorado High School Activities Association board of directors and the legislative council before approval. If any of the steps along the review process are not approved, that sport's quest for sanctioning ends there, according to a story posted on CHSAANow.com.

Listed below are presentation highlights from each sport as reported by CHSAANow.com.

Unified bowling

  • 32 schools offered teams in 2018. They anticipate 50 in 2019.
  • There were 350 participants in 2018. They anticipate 500 in 2019.
  • 76 percent of the schools who responded to a survey were in favor of sanctioning.
  • Because the sport is coed, Title IX would not be impacted.

Girls’ wrestling

  • There are 114 schools who have girls participating.
  • More than 300 girls are participating this season.
  • 80 percent of the schools who responded to a survey were in favor of sanctioning.
  • Adding a girls sport would have a positive impact in terms of Title IX proportionality.

Boys’ volleyball

  • In 2018, there were 60 teams. They anticipate 75 in 2019.
  • In 2018, there were 750 players. They anticipate 1,000 in 2019.
  • 71 percent of the schools who responded to a survey were in favor of sanctioning.
  • Their analysis of Title IX implications and proportionality showed that 54 percent of schools would likely be able to add a boys' volleyball program and maintain compliance without counting spirit as a sport. If a school counts spirit as a sport, 74 percent of schools can add a team, according to the group's analysis. (Note: These figures only account for adding a boys' volleyball program by itself; it doesn't account for a scenario where girls' wrestling were added at the same time, which would only help.)

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