As Maurice Sendak’s classic storybook ‘Where the Wild Things Are’ aptly states, “There should be a place where only the things you want to happen, happen.”

Many of us grew up reading the book with our parents and, as evidenced by worldwide sales of more than 19 million copies and a well-received motion picture version, it is still popular with today’s families. With that in mind, Cordera has planned to follow up their two existing storybook-themed parks (based on Alice in Wonderland and Charlotte’s Web) with 'Wild Rumpus Park' — inspired by Sendak’s award-winning story.

The idea came when the design team began to acknowledge the inherent “wildness” of the site that had been set aside for the park. They feel the theme is a great fit with the natural terrain, and a catalyst for the type of imaginative play that they’d like to encourage in the community’s children. Similar to Max’s journey from his bedroom to an island inhabited by fantastic creatures, children will simply leave their nearby homes to enjoy the natural beauty and sense of discovery the park will inspire.

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Courtesy of Cordera

The 16-acre park follows more recent design trends that have begun to move away from standardized play and more toward unstructured play. The design also incorporates modern trends that aim to utilize the site’s natural assets and systems. It is the perfect reflection on Max’s wild flight of imagination that occurs in the book. The design is also unique in providing play areas throughout the acreage of the park, rather than having the amusements contained to one designated ‘playground’ area.

Some of the most impressive aspects are the creative features that reference back to images from the book. For example, boardwalk crossings over a natural drainage channel that runs through the site will be made to look like the leaves in the trees illustrated throughout the book. Stamped concrete “Monster Footprints” will appear in areas. Located at the western entrance to the park will be a crown and scepter sculpture created by a local artist, that looks just like the crown and scepter Max wore on his imaginary island. The natural play area will encourage children to let their imaginations run wild, as Max’s did in the story.

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Courtesy of Cordera

Wild Rumpus Park will also aim to highlight the site’s incredible natural beauty and character, with opportunities to explore and enjoy mature existing vegetation, rolling topography and vast views of Pikes Peak. A variety of amenities such as age-targeted, traditional, and natural play areas are planned for the park to encourage discovery.

This Nature Play/Discovery Area will provide natural obstacles for users to climb, crawl and balance on — elements such as boulders, logs and sand — that will encourage unstructured play. All good features for any aspiring “King of the Wild Things” working on their monster-taming skills.

La Plata Communities, the developer of Cordera, believes that this park is not only an outstanding lifestyle amenity for community residents, but it is also expected to increase and maintain the values of the adjacent homes in Cordera, while continuing to enhance the quality of life for all residents. It will truly be unlike any other park in the region. So, as Max says in the story, “Let the wild rumpus start!”

Visit cordera.com for more information.