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This image released by Doug Roland Films shows Steven Prescod as Tereek, left, and Robert Tarango as Artie, in a scene from "Feeling Through." The disabled have a moment in the Oscar spotlight that they hope becomes a movement. Tarango, the deaf-blind star of the nominated short, says his film can help alleviate the fear of hiring actors like him. (Doug Roland Films via AP)

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This image released by Doug Roland Films shows Steven Prescod as Tereek, left, and Robert Tarango as Artie, in a scene from "Feeling Through." The disabled have a moment in the Oscar spotlight that they hope becomes a movement. Tarango, the deaf-blind star of the nominated short, says his film can help alleviate the fear of hiring actors like him. (Doug Roland Films via AP)

  • Updated

This image released by Doug Roland Films shows Steven Prescod as Tereek, left, and Robert Tarango as Artie, in a scene from "Feeling Through." The disabled have a moment in the Oscar spotlight that they hope becomes a movement. Tarango, the deaf-blind star of the nominated short, says his film can help alleviate the fear of hiring actors like him. (Doug Roland Films via AP)

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FILE - Co-directors Jim LeBrecht, left, and Nicole Newnham from the documentary "Crip Camp" are seen during the Sundance Film Festival on Jan. 24, 2020, in Park City, Utah. The disabled have a moment in the Oscar spotlight that they hope becomes a movement. LeBrecht, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, says a golden age for disabled films could come if Hollywood lets them tell their own stories. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)

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FILE - In this Jan. 24, 2020 file photo, co-directors Jim LeBrecht, left, and Nicole Newnham, center, from the documentary "Crip Camp" pose with film subject Judith Heumann during the Sundance Film Festival in Park City, Utah. The disabled have a moment in the Oscar spotlight that they hope becomes a movement. LeBrecht, who has spina bifida and uses a wheelchair, says a golden age for disabled films could come if Hollywood lets them tell their own stories. (Photo by Charles Sykes/Invision/AP, File)