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The pandemic and its accompanying stressors have not been kind to our hair. Dr. Maria Sheron, a dermatologist at Vanguard Skin Specialists, has seen a noticeable uptick in visits from people experiencing telogen effluvium, the temporary hair loss caused by stress that pushes hair roots into the resting state. This is in line with what dermatologists across the country are noticing.

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The William J. Hybl Sports Medicine and Performance Center, which opened in mid-2020 on the University of Colorado at Colorado Springs campus, is owned by the university and partly-rented by Centura Health. The center was intended to attract users from around the country, but its three branches — sports performance, sports medicine and academics — are open to the public.

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Meditation teacher Steffany Butts-Boucher and Erin Gocinski, a Manitou Springs High School art teacher who teaches mindfulness to her students, created Treehouse Meditation for parents and children. The hour-long practice is intended to help kids learn how their minds work and how the breath can affect how they feel. It also can serve as a way for parent and child to connect, and help with stress management and developing mindfulness and empathy. 

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As the gift-giving frenzy of the holidays approaches, do it a little differently this year, and find gifts based on the five love languages, as best-selling author Gary Chapman defined in his 1992 book, "The Five Love Languages: How to Express Heartfelt Commitment to Your Mate." The five languages are: gifts, acts of service, words of affirmation, physical affection and quality time.

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Google "most important meal of the day," and what leaps to the top? Breakfast. Which poses several questions: What do you consume as the first meal of the day? And why do we eat the foods we do first thing in the morning? Why are doughnuts an acceptable choice, but chocolate cake is typically not? And who decided bacon and eggs were more appropriate than, say, a steamy bowl of minestrone? 

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Canadian Lindsay Istace founded rage yoga after a bad breakup around 2015, when traditional yoga classes weren't quite what she was looking for. She started sprinkling in screaming, loud music, middle fingers and cursing to her yoga practice, and then brought it to the public. It was a hit, and she now has instructors teaching rage yoga classes in Canada and the U.S. Her new book, "Rage Yoga," is set for release Nov. 2. She'll be at Denver's Woods Boss Brewing Company Jan. 15 to do a book signing and lead a rage yoga retreat.