Ballot drop box

Six Colorado Springs City Council seats are up for grabs. The election is on April 6.

Numbers don’t lie. The push to sell all of Colorado’s nine electoral votes to California is funded almost entirely by, wait for it … California.

A staggering 99.7% of money spent to control our votes comes from out of state. Of that, 98.1% comes straight from California. Only 0.28% comes from Colorado.

State voters will decide in November 2020 whether to uphold the 2019 Legislature’s outrageous attempt to circumvent the Electoral College — established by the U.S. Constitution — by joining the National Popular Vote Compact. Gov. Jared Polis signed the bill into law, meaning California and a handful of other large states could control presidential elections and negate election outcomes in Colorado and other smaller states.

Monument Mayor Don Wilson and Mesa County Commissioner Rose Pugliese launched a petition to put this matter to a vote of the people. They gathered 183,673 valid signatures to put on the 2020 ballot a measure that asks whether Colorado should join the compact.

The correct vote is “no,” for those who want to protect Colorado and the U.S. Constitution.

As reported by Colorado Politics, the “Yes on National Popular Vote” campaign has $744,646 as of the first campaign finance filing deadline. Of that money, only $2,125 came from Colorado donors. No Colorado donation exceeded $100, and the $2,125 came from 46 donors.

California donors gave $730,485 — a staggering 98.1% of the money directed at buying Colorado’s votes. Of that, 67% came from activist liberal benefactor Stephen Silberstein.

Most of the California money comes from a few wealthy donors who buy political outcomes. Examples:

• Silberstein, of Belvedere, Calif., — $500,000

• Intel executive Craig Barratt of Santa Clara, Calif.,— $100,000

• Lottery scratch ticket co-inventor John Koza of Los Altos, Calif., — $55,000 (Koza chairs the National Popular Vote Compact board of directors)

• Bart Burstein, a telecom executive from Palo Alto, Calif.,— $35,000

Meanwhile, the campaign to protect Colorado’s electoral autonomy has $762,379. Nearly all of the money came from donors who live in Colorado.

By design of this country’s founders, the popular vote is irrelevant. Founders wanted it that way precisely so states with massive special-interest populations could not subdue the influence of smaller states.

The donations tell a story that should frighten all Coloradans. Beyond dispute, a few big-money California donors want to control Colorado. Between now and November 2020, they may spare no expense.

Do not let California buy your vote. Preserve Colorado’s sovereignty. Spread the word among family, friends, neighbors and colleagues. Vote “no” on a law that would steal Colorado’s votes for California’s gain.

The Gazette Editorial Board

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