Empty Classroom

Empty Classroom

Raise the academic bar for schools

Regarding the Gazette editorial, Sept. 2, by Walter Williams, “Nonsense of diversity, equity and inclusion,” was right on target. Black people cannot expect to have high paying jobs with low quality educations. Political responses to poor or inferior schools often attended by many Black and brown children such as raising the minimum wage, will only reduces entry employment options.

Recently, an NBA player was interviewed on TV and he suggested, “education is the key to a successful future.” I totally agree. We cannot continue to under educate our minority population and think by raising the minimum wage; we as a nation will move them into the middle class. Recent history tells us solid backgrounds in math and science is more likely to lead to higher paying jobs and greater economic opportunities.

Seldom will you find doctors, scientist, nurses, rioting and vandalizing property. Wake up, America; we must demand public schools do a better job of educating all of our children especially our minority children who are often trapped in low performing and low expectation schools. We must raise the academic bar for all schools, and we will have a stronger and more productive America. This cannot be about being politically correct or the nonsense of “diversity, equity and inclusion” at the cost of a high quality competitive education.

Willie Breazell

Colorado Springs

Hard to see through the hype, spin

Now that the conventions are done, and election season is in full swing, we’ll be bombarded with slick ads, junk mail, phone calls, email, and social media seeking to influence our voting decisions. As a lifelong political independent, I know it’s hard to see through the hype and spin. If you want to make a reasoned choice, I suggest asking yourself a simple, clarifying question I heard in a long ago debate.

“Are you better off than you were four years ago?”

While the answer might not be simple, you won’t need the politicians, parties, special interests, Russian trolls, or the media’s help to answer it. Just consult your life, values, and the ones you care about.

If you answer yes, stay the course, and vote for the incumbent. Otherwise, as then candidate Ronald Reagan said, “I can suggest another choice.”

Joe Loyall

Colorado Springs

For retention of the ‘Indian’ mascot

As a long-standing, erstwhile “Cheyenner,” I cannot think of a better way to argue for the retention of our “Indian” mascot, a figure dedicated to dignity, maturity, responsibility and leadership, all the attributes the school attempted to inculcate in all of. Was this “racist?” You bet it was!

Whitney Galbraith

Colorado Springs

Why use animals as mascots?

To those that object to the Cheyenne Mountain High School mascot, the Indians, I think they are not thinking.

They claim that it is insulting and demeaning to have Indians as a mascot. I disagree; ask yourselves, what about the eagles, bears, lions, buffalo, etc. You may think, “Well I am human and I have rights”. I believe and so does Native American cosmology hold the animal in high esteem. Why do you not vocally object to the use of those proud animals as mascots. Who speaks for them? Well, the humanist states, the animals are here only to serve humans. Oh, really? I disagree.

Marshall Griffith

Colorado Springs

The greatest bang for our buck

What’s all the rumble about socialism? I paid into Social Security for 60 years; now I’m getting a nice/needed monthly check. That’s socialism! I appreciate the medical care, and VA check I receive monthly. That’s socialism! I also like my monthly check from a lifetime of payment into teachers annuity. That’s socialism! I also paid into Colorado’s PERA, now I get help on my health care plan. That’s socialism!

I really respect President Eisenhower, who urged us as a nation to create a national highway system, and we did. We choose when and where our money should be spent for highways, then contracted with private corporations to build these wonderful roads, which I so enjoy traveling on now. That’s socialism and capitalism together. Both — intelligent and responsible.

We combine these systems for many areas of our social needs: hospitals, prisons, schools, universities, etc. Leaving any of these solely to private, for-profit corporations would weaken us as a society. Using our common largess for the greater common good strengthens us individually and collectively.

So stop the cheap, mindless belly-aching about socialism and accept the fact that it is always both: socialism and capitalism. At our best, that’s the way we succeed. Either one of these alone weakens our society. It is always both! We have to decide what holds the greater good for all of us. What humanely gives us the ‘greatest bang for our buck’?

Dean E. Tollefson

Colorado Springs

Tatiana Bailey’s column was excellent

The local economist’s opinion column published in this past Sunday’s Gazette was really excellent. It was written in clear, easily understood language, logically presented and backed by facts from reputable, reliable information sources. Though I’ve read other writings on these topics, her column really made the points clear.

Economic disparity between the haves and have-nots in the U.S. is a critical issue for our society — one that politicians and government and the business community have long ignored in just about every substantive way. So often, it is people of color who bear the brunt of these policies, though undereducated or otherwise marginalize whites fall victim as well.

We are seeing the product of this inaction being borne out in today’s economy — exacerbated by the pandemic and made possible by years of monetary policy at the state and federal levels that turned a blind eye to the average American’s inability to get a foothold in an economy designed to favor the wealthy and well-educated. We are wise to take heed and do what we can to encourage change.

Kudos to Bailey for her insightful and informative writing, and thanks to The Gazette for publishing it.

Kelley McCready

Colorado Springs

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