WWII soldier’s letter to mother delivered nearly eight decades late

After nearly eight decades, a World War II soldier's letter was finally delivered.

World War II had ended three months prior when Army Sgt. John Gonsalves wrote to his mother in December 1945 while still stationed in Bad Orb, Germany, "I'll be seeing you soon, I hope."

U.S. Postal Service workers in Pittsburgh recently discovered the undelivered letter written by Sgt. Gonsalves, who was 22 years old at the time, and delivered it 76 years later to his widow, Angelina Gonsalves, who lives near Boston.

"I love it. I love it. When I think it's all his words, I can't believe it," Mrs. Gonsalves told WBZ-TV after opening the letter in December. "It's wonderful. And I feel like I have him here with me, you know?"

Mrs. Gonsalves met the young soldier in 1949. They would marry four years later. Sgt. Gonsalves died in 2015, according to WFXT.

In his letter, Sgt. Gonsalves wrote that he was doing well but did not enjoy the food.

"Dear Mom, Received another letter from you today and was happy to hear that everything is okay," Gonzalves wrote. "As for myself, I'm fine and getting along okay. But as far as the food it's pretty lousy most of the time."

"Love and kisses, Your son, Johnny," he added. "I'll be seeing you soon, I hope."

Along with the letter, Mrs. Gonsalves told WFXT that USPS included a note sharing its condolences.

"We are uncertain where this letter has been for the past seven-plus decades, but it arrived at our facility approximately six weeks ago," the letter read. "Due to the age and significance to your family history … delivering this letter was of utmost importance to us."

Sgt. and Mrs. Gonsalves shared 61 years of marriage together and raised five children.

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"It's like he came back to me, you know? Really. That was amazing," Mrs. Gonsalves told WFXT. "He was a good man. He really was. Everybody loved him."

Original Location: WWII soldier’s letter to mother delivered nearly eight decades late

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