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A snowplow clears snow on Hwy. 105 between Monument and Palmer Lake in this gazette file photo.

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For those going to the Broncos game against the Rams Sunday, be sure to bundle up!

A major snowstorm is expected to "blast" into southern Colorado on Sunday, meteorologists say, plunging temperatures about 40 degrees after a mild Saturday.

Saturday's high will be in the mid-60s, but the National Weather Service warned of below-freezing temperatures Sunday, with areas in the eastern mountains and plains reaching 40 degrees below average. Temperatures are expected to be between 25 and 14 degrees in Colorado Springs Sunday, compared with the average of 64 degrees for Oct. 14.

"The first winterlike storm of the season will blast into southern Colorado on Sunday," the National Weather Service in Pueblo said. "The storm will bring gusty north winds, sharply colder temperatures and snow to much of the region."

The best chances for snow should be over the eastern mountains and plains, with the greatest accumulations south of U.S. 50. Most places, including Colorado Springs, are forecast to receive 1 to 3 inches, though some areas could see up to a foot, the weather service said.

Heaviest snowfall in Colorado Springs is expected to be Sunday morning, the weather service predicted, though precipitation is in the forecast from Saturday night into Monday morning.

A wintry storm Wednesday left a light dusting from the foothills to the Colorado Springs Airport — where 1.3 inches was recorded.

The average date of the city’s first measurable snowfall — greater than or equal to 0.1 inches of snow — is Oct. 26, the weather service says.

The earliest arrival was Sept. 3, 1961, when 4.2 inches fell in Colorado Springs.

Colorado Springs should see a quick recovery, with temperatures climbing back into the 40s on Monday, then soaring to the high 50s by the end of next week.

Twitter: @lizmforster

Phone: 636-0193

Liz Forster is a general assignment reporter with a focus on environment and public safety. She is a Colorado College graduate, avid hiker and skier, and sweet potato enthusiast. Liz joined The Gazette in June 2017.

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