Curbside food delivery is so early days of the pandemic.

But ordering up curbside performances by Pikes Peak region artists? Current day pandemic.

Cultural Office of the Pikes Peak Region recently unveiled a program: Curbside Culture. It’s a windfall for those desperately craving live entertainment after months without, and also a boon for artists, whose livelihoods have been put on an indefinite pause.

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Fifteen popular artists and groups are now available to perform outside a home, business or any gathering spot where the host can provide electricity via an extension cord and gather a small audience that adheres to distancing guidelines.

“A lot don’t have artistic work right now. I’m sure it’s having a financial and psychological impact,” says COPPeR Executive Director Andy Vick. “This is a small attempt to give folks an opportunity to perform again.”

Available performers include Ormao Dance Company, saxophonist Tony Exum Jr., guitarist Ryan Flores and Dragonfly Aerial Company, who are available for 15-, 30- or 60-minute shows at a range of prices decided by the performer. A 60-minute show by one person from Dragonfly is $475, while a performance by one to five musicians from the Chamber Orchestra of the Springs has a minimum rate of $125 per musician for up to one hour in a covered location.

Harriett Landrum creates original music with her violin and electronic looping. Her prices include a 15-minute set of three original songs for $50.

“Being able to get out and interact in some way, shape or form is super important,” says Landrum, who’s also a music teacher. “People who listen are the other side of the equation. Without them we have very little. It’s an ambassadorship between those two peoples.”

Go online to PeakRadar.com/CurbsideCulture to peruse the roster of artists, which Vick anticipates will grow. Interested performers are encouraged to apply. Financial interactions are between the host and the performer. COPPeR takes none of the proceeds.

Through the upcoming weeks, COPPeR will run contests on its social media accounts (@artsculturefun on Facebook, PeakRadar on Instagram) to encourage the community to use the new program. Contest winners could win certificates worth hundreds of dollars applicable toward hiring an artist.

“We hope it gives a new opportunity to the community,” Vick says.

“We hope they think of it as not only a way to enjoy the arts, but provide support to artists who are trying to make a go of it in these challenging times.”Contact the writer: 636-0270

Contact the writer: 636-0270

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