A total of 47 films, including shorts, features and documentaries, will be screened at the 32nd annual Rocky Mountain Women’s Film Festival, which runs Nov. 15-17 at sites around Colorado College’s campus. Yes, that’s a lot of movies from which to choose. Looking for a place to start? Here are details about 10 of the films on the festival’s schedule (synopses courtesy of RMWFF): View full schedule here.

Films with local ties:

”Unsettled: Seeking Refuge in America”

Screening: 9 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Cornerstone Arts Center’s Screening Room, 825 N Cascade Ave., and 11:10 a.m. Nov. 16 at Kathryn Mohrman Theatre in Armstrong Hall, 14 E Cache La Poudre St.

Tom Shepard, a filmmaker from Colorado Springs, follows the untold stories of LGBTQ refugees and asylum seekers as they flee their homes and begin new lives in the U.S.

”Art for the People: Eric Bransby, American Mural Artist”

Screening: 11:10 a.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Taylor Theatre in Bemis Hall, 920 N Cascade Ave.

Colorado Springs filmmakers Nancy Bentley and John Atkinson teamed up to tell the story of local artist Eric Bansby. This biodocumentary film follows the life and work of Bransby, who is known for his dozens of public murals in Colorado, Kansas, Missouri, Illinois and Utah. At the age of 102, he is still teaching at Colorado Springs Fine Arts Center.

”Unshaken: The Road to Woo”

Screening: 1:15 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Taylor Theatre in Bemis Hall, 920 N Cascade Ave.

Denise Ferrari tells the story of a Denver musical artist, Wendy Woo, and the Wendy Woo Band. The 40-minute documentary shares Woo’s experiences as a business woman, musician and mother.

”Black Flag”

Screening: 2:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17, at Kathryn Mohrman Theatre in Armstrong Hall, 14 E Cache La Poudre St.

Colorado Springs native and Colorado College alum Sophia Capp is behind this film about dorm-mates Sydney, who is from Georgia, and Deja, who is from Detroit, starting their freshman year together. The story unfolds when Sydney decorates their shared room with a little piece of “Southern pride.”

”As We Were”

Screening: 11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 17, at Cornerstone Arts Center’s Richard F. Celeste Theatre, 825 N Cascade Ave.

Fengyi Xu, who graduated from Colorado College in 2018, presents her thesis film project. The short film is about about a girl named Alex, who, on a winter afternoon, “must realize the importance of family and her responsibility for her grandfather, remembering that he had done the same for her when she was little,” according to the film’s online description.

Films that show the power of human connection:

”Skid Row Marathon”

Screening: 9 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 17, at Cornerstone Arts Center’s Richard F. Celeste Theatre, 825 N Cascade Ave.

Director Mark Hayes brings to the festival the story of a criminal court judge who starts a running club on Los Angeles’ skid row. There, he trains a group of homeless people, addicts and criminals to run international marathons.

”Scattering CJ”

Screening: 11:10 a.m. Saturday. Nov. 16, at Cornerstone Arts Center’s Screening Room, 825 N Cascade Ave., and 11 a.m. Sunday, Nov. 17, at Cornerstone Art Center’s Richard F. Celeste Theatre 825 N Cascade Ave.

Andrea Kalin, who is attending the Rocky Mountain Women’s Film Festival, directed this film about a heartbroken mother who asked the world to help honor the memory of her son. Her loss become the journey of many.

After Dark Party fi

lms:

”Maiden”

Screening: 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Kathryn Mohrman Theatre in Armstrong Hall, 14 E Cache La Poudre St.

Directed by Alex Holmes, “Maiden” is the story of Tracy Edwards, a 24-year-old cook on charter boats who became the skipper of the first all-female crew to enter the Whitbread Round the World Race in 1989.

”Hail Satan?”

Screening: 8 p.m. Saturday, Nov. 16, at Cornerstone Arts Center’s Richard F. Celeste Theatre, 825 N Cascade Ave.

Penny Lane chronicles the extraordinary rise of one of the most colorful and controversial religious movements in American history. The Satanic Temple advocates for justice and equality, putting up a hell of a fight.

Opening night film:

”Moonlight Sanata: Deafness in Three Movements”

Screening: 6 p.m. Friday, Nov. 15, and 4:30 p.m. Sunday, Nov. 17, at Cornerstone Arts Center’s Celeste Theatre, 825 N Cascade Ave.,

In 2007, Irene Taylor Brodsky’s “Hear and Now,” about her deaf parents, screened at the Rocky Mountain Women’s Film Festival. She returns this year with a film about her deaf son, his deaf grandfather growing old and the life of Ludwig van Beethoven when he was blindsided by deafness and wrote his iconic sonata.

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