Book cover

Colorado Springs author Karl Hering recently released a romance adventure novel titled “Long Climb Up to Find Home.”

When Karl Hering goes running, his imagination runs, too.

On one run in Bear Creek Park, Hering got the idea for a story.

The story, he imagined, would blend romance, adventure and murder.

The result is a book Hering recently self-published via Dorrance Publishing Co., called “Long Climb Up To Find Home.”

The book, according to its summary, is about a long-distance runner and hiker named Wade, who “thinks he is prepared for just about anything until he makes a startling discovery high atop a mountain on a search-and-rescue mission.” The mountain, by the way, is Pikes Peak. There, Wade meets a woman who “has a mission of her own.”

By the end, the description reads, “the reader will witness that adversity can be conquered and can even lead to a more satisfying life.”

It’s one of the first books Hering, who is 86, has written in his life. As a systems engineer for most of his career, he did technical writing and wrote for trade journals. Since retiring, the Colorado Springs resident has started weaving fictionalized tales.

Hering says he gets inspiration from his own life, family and the people he has met. He was born in Germany and his family immigrated to the U.S. when he was 15. He didn’t know English and had to repeat his freshman year of high school. Classmates made fun of the way he talked.

Looking back, Hering sees the transition as a positive.

“Coming to this country opened up so many doors for me,” Hering said.

He owes his love of writing, in part, to his brothers. Hering grew up as one of seven kids.

“I would tell stories to my younger brother,” Hering said. “He was not happy when I said, ‘That’s the end of it.’”

His older brother always wanted to be a novelist. Hering dedicated “The Long Climb Up To Find Home” to him, writing, “This book is dedicated to my oldest brother, Christoph, who because of happenings beyond his control, never got to achieve his interest in writing stories and see them in print. Since I was 8 years old, he advised me to observe and eventually use all the information gained to write novels.”

He’s proud, he said, that he carried on his brother’s passion.

“I have a wild imagination,” Hering said. “And this is how I have fun with it.”

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