Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

Woman who sent texts urging suicide guilty of manslaughter

By: The Associated Press
June 16, 2017 Updated: June 16, 2017 at 11:14 pm
0
Caption +
FILE - In this Monday, June 12, 2017 file photo, Michelle Carter stands as court is in recess at the end of the day at her trial in Taunton, Mass. Carter is charged with involuntary manslaughter for encouraging Conrad Roy III to kill himself in July 2014. The judge is set to issue a verdict in the case on Friday. (Faith Ninivaggi/The Boston Herald via AP, Pool, File)

TAUNTON, Mass. — A woman who sent her boyfriend a barrage of text messages urging him to kill himself when they were both teenagers was convicted Friday of involuntary manslaughter in a trial that raised questions of whether words can kill.

Juvenile Court Judge Lawrence Moniz found that Michelle Carter caused the death of Conrad Roy III, who intentionally filled his truck with carbon monoxide in a store parking lot in July 2014. Carter cried as Moniz detailed her conduct in explaining how he reached his verdict, but she remained stoic when it was formally pronounced.

Texting Suicide
Michelle Carter cries while flanked by defense attorneys Joseph Cataldo, left, and Cory Madera, after being found guilty of involuntary manslaughter in the suicide of Conrad Roy III, Friday, June 16, 2017, in Bristol Juvenile Court in Taunton, Mass. (Glenn C.Silva/Fairhaven Neighborhood News, Pool) 

The judge noted that the 18-year-old Roy climbed out of the truck as it was filling with toxic gas and told Carter he was scared. "Get back in," Carter told Roy, according to a friend who testified Carter described the conversation in a text message to her about a month after Roy died.

"This court finds that instructing Mr. Roy to 'get back in' the truck constitutes wanton and reckless conduct by Ms. Carter," the judge said.

He said Carter had a duty to call someone for help when she knew Roy was attempting suicide. Yet she did not call the police or Roy's family, he noted.

"She did not issue a simple additional instruction: Get out of the truck," the judge said.

Sobs broke out throughout the courtroom when the verdict was announced.

The judge ruled that Carter, now 20, can remain free on bail but ordered her not to make any contact with Roy's family. She also isn't allowed to leave the state.

Texting Suicide
Michelle Carter appears in Taunton Juvenile Court on Friday, June 9, 2017. A judge has denied a request for a not-guilty verdict by an attorney for Carter who is charged with involuntary manslaughter for allegedly convincing her boyfriend to kill himself through a series of text messages. (Glenn Silva/Fairhaven Neighborhood News/Pool via AP) 

She could face up to 20 years in prison. A sentencing hearing was scheduled for Aug. 3.

The sensational trial in Taunton offered a window into teen depression and suicide through text messages and Facebook communications.

Carter, who chose to have a judge hear the case over a jury, was 17 when she sent Roy dozens of messages urging him to take his own life. Roy, 18, was found dead of carbon monoxide poisoning in his truck in a store parking lot in Fairhaven.

"I thought you wanted to do this. The time is right and you're ready, you just need to do it!" Carter wrote in one message.

Carter's lawyer, Joseph Cataldo, argued Roy had a history of depression and suicide attempts and was determined to end his own life. He said Carter initially tried to talk Roy out of it and urged him to get professional help, but eventually went along with his plan.

The judge disagreed, saying he did not take into account in his verdict Roy's previous attempts at suicide.

An involuntary manslaughter charge can be brought in Massachusetts when someone causes the death of another person when engaging in reckless or wanton conduct that creates a high degree of likelihood of substantial harm.

Dr. Peter Breggin, a psychiatrist testifying for the defense, said Carter was a "very troubled youngster" who suffered from depression. At the time of Roy's death, Carter was taking Celexa, an antidepressant Breggin said targets the brain's frontal lobe, which controls empathy and decision-making.

Breggin said Carter was in the grips of a "grandiose" delusion that she alone could help Roy find his way to heaven and she would care for his family.

Prosecutors focused on a series of text messages Carter sent Roy in the days before he killed himself.

"You can't think about it. You just have to do it. You said you were gonna do it. Like I don't get why you aren't," Carter wrote to Roy the day of his suicide.

Prosecutors have argued the text messages support their claim that Carter caused Roy's death by recklessly helping him poison himself.

Carter and Roy met in Florida in 2012 while visiting relatives. Their relationship largely consisted of text messages and emails.

Comments have been disabled for this article Comment Policy
Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

Some news is free.
Exceptional journalism takes time, effort and your support.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.