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Obama says US finishing the job in Afghanistan; 9800 troops to remain

By: JULIE PACE, AP White House Correspondent
May 27, 2014 Updated: May 27, 2014 at 1:12 pm
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photo - FILE - This May 25, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking during a troop rally after arriving at Bagram Air Field for an unannounced visit, north of Kabul, Afghanistan. Senior U.S. administration officials say President Barack Obama will seek to keep 9,800 U.S. troops in Afghanistan after the war formally ends later this year. Nearly all of those forces are to be out by the end of 2016, as Obama finishes his second term. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File)
FILE - This May 25, 2014 file photo shows President Barack Obama speaking during a troop rally after arriving at Bagram Air Field for an unannounced visit, north of Kabul, Afghanistan. Senior U.S. administration officials say President Barack Obama will seek to keep 9,800 U.S. troops in Afghanistan after the war formally ends later this year. Nearly all of those forces are to be out by the end of 2016, as Obama finishes his second term. (AP Photo/ Evan Vucci, File) 

WASHINGTON — Seeking to turn the page on more than a decade of war, President Barack Obama announced plans Tuesday for greatly reducing U.S. forces in Afghanistan by the end of the year and then ending the U.S. military commitment there by the end of 2016.

"We have now been in Afghanistan longer than many Americans expected," Obama acknowledged during an appearance in the White House Rose Garden. "Now we're finishing the job we've started."

Even as Obama set a timetable for the drawdown, he said he would keep nearly 10,000 American troops in Afghanistan after the U.S. combat mission formally ends later this year. Those troops would focus on training Afghan security forces and on counterterrorism efforts.

The president said his drawdown plan was contingent on the Afghan government signing a bilateral security agreement with the U.S. Afghan President Hamid Karzai has refused to sign the accord, but the U.S. is optimistic that the two candidates seeking to replace him in the ongoing Afghan elections will finalize the agreement.

Obama's blueprint calls for cutting the current force of 32,000 to 9,800 by the start of next year. Those troops, dispatched throughout Afghanistan, would not be engaged in combat missions.

Over the course of next year, the number of troops would be cut in half and consolidated in the capital of Kabul and at Bagram Air Field, the main U.S. base in Afghanistan. Those remaining forces would largely be withdrawn by the end of 2016, with fewer than 1,000 remaining behind to staff a security office in Kabul.

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