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U.S. Rep. Coffman promises to protect Colorado pot from Attorney General Sessions

March 23, 2017 Updated: March 23, 2017 at 10:41 am
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U.S. Rep. Mike Coffman vowed to stand up to Donald Trump during his re-election bid in Colorado's 6th Congressional District last year, so he's starting with Attorney General Jeff Sessions.

Republican Coffman will keep Sessions' mitts off Colorado pot, he said at a fundraiser at a steakhouse in Aurora last weekend, according to Ernest Luning at the Colorado Statesman.

"I didn't support it. I think it was a bad decision for Colorado," Coffman said about marijuana at the fund-raiser that coincided with Coffman's 62nd birthday.

The congressman and husband of Colorado's attorney general, Cynthia Coffman. noted "So, I'm in the awkward position of having to defend ... Colorado's position, that it has really taken, in front of the Congress."

Sure, Sessions thinks pot smokers are dopes, but his boss, President Trump, ran on a hands-off, state's rights message. If Trump follows through on a promise to build a wall, keeping his word on pot should be a foregone matter.

White House spokesman Sean Spicer first raised concerns among the nation's $7 billion pot industry last month when he said Trump would leave a thumbprint on drug enforcement.

Sessions heightened those concerns soon after by trash-talking pot and state's rights to a conference of state attorneys general.

"States, they can pass the laws they choose," he said. "I would just say, it does remain a violation of federal law to distribute marijuana throughout any place in the United States, whether a state legalizes it or not."

To that Coffman said, via The Statesman, "I'm going to have to go up against him."

While my money is on Coffman in any hand-to-hand combat, the congressman has something else in mind.

"You can write amendments in the appropriations bill in the negative, and what you say is, 'No federal funds will be used for X' - to block the attorney general from coming into Colorado," he told the steakhouse crowd.

"So it puts me in a bad position, personally, but as a representative for this state, in a decision Colorado has made and placed in our Constitution, that is a decision I have to defend."

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