Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

The Survival Doctor from Colorado Springs finds plethora of medical uses for common duct tape

photo - James Hubbard, aka the Survival Doctor, has written a new book called "Duct Tape 911" about the medical uses of duct tape.     (The Gazette, Christian Murdock) + caption
James Hubbard, aka the Survival Doctor, has written a new book called "Duct Tape 911" about the medical uses of duct tape. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)
By Tracy Mobley-Martinez Updated: July 1, 2014 at 11:01 am 0

So, there you are, hiking happily miles away from the trailhead, and a little misstep results in a loud snap. Your leg is broken. You're alone. Your cell is out of range.

What do you do?

You might not know, but Dr. James Hubbard, a blogger and columnist who is best known as The Survival Doctor, has the treatment hard-wired. First, check the leg for color and circulation. If that's good, splint it. Branches will work, he says. Or you can use duct tape.

The latter is the subject of Hubbard's second book, "Duct Tape 911: The Many Amazing Medical Things You Can Do to Tape Yourself Together."

Why duct tape, a tool developed during World War II to seal ammunition cases?

As Hubbard write in the book, it's versatile, strong, easy to tear, easy to shape, sticky and waterproof.

"I love to find household items that you can use for medical purposes. They're around," says Hubbard, 61. "Sometimes you have to think outside the box. Not only does the book give you the descriptions about how to use it, you can learn a little bit as you go along about injuries."

As a family practitioner in Pontotoc, Miss., Hubbard ran into about every kind of injury or condition to befall man. He learned about his craft and about people.

"That's also where I started learning how to treat medical problems when you have a scarcity of supplies," he says.

It turns out that not everyone got a first-aid badge in Girl Scouts and Boy Scouts. In fact, Hubbard says, many didn't know the most basic rules of first aid. Applying pressure to a cut, for instance.

"It's surprising, but I've had very intelligent people in panic situations, when something happens to them, they forget," he says. "I like to say that you need to know some of the emergency life-saving things as a reflex almost."

He tried coaching his patients during visits, but "it's not a very good place to teach. People are anxious and hurting. So I started giving handouts. Then I thought, what else could I do so people could learn more about medicine in general and their health."

In 2003, he started a national magazine called My Family Doctor, which enjoyed a seven-year run. Then came blogging.

"I thought I would have some following," says Hubbard, who moved to Colorado Springs 12 years ago. He's semiretired. "I've certainly exceeded that expectation. I thought I'd have about a tenth of what I have."

Today, TheSurvivalDoctor.com sees about a half million visitors a month and his Facebook page boasts about 120,000 fans. His column also runs each month in The Gazette. People magazine has sought his advice for a story. Women's Health Magazine and various TV stations have called, too.

As useful as readers might find "Duct Tape 911" (and his first book, "Living Ready Pocket Manual First Aid"), calling 911 or seeking trained medical help is preferable, Hubbard says. His strategies are for the times when neither is an option.

His best piece of advice for those moments?

"Take a second and try not to panic," he says. "Then, if there's no one more qualified than you, go for it."

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DETAILS

"Duct Tape 911: The Many Amazing Medical Things You Can Do to Tape Yourself Together"by James Hubbard; self-published (104 pages, $12.99)

Available at Barnes & Noble, Sam's Club and thesurvival doctor.com.

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Duct tape history

A division of Johnson & Johnson made medical adhesive tapes from duck cloth starting in 1927. During World War II, a team developed an adhesive tape for the U.S. military intended to seal ammunition cases against moisture. The tape was required to be ripped by hand, not cut with scissors. According to Johnson & Johnson, the idea came from an ordnance factory worker - and mother of two Navy sailors - named Vesta Stoudt, who worried that problems with ammunition box seals would cost soldiers precious time in battle. She wrote to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1943 with the idea to seal the boxes with a fabric tape, which she had tested at her factory. The letter was forwarded to the War Production Board, who put Johnson & Johnson on the job.

The unnamed product was made of thin cotton duck tape coated in waterproof polyethylene (plastic) with a layer of rubber-based gray adhesive ("Polycoat") bonded to one side. It was easy to apply and remove and soon was adapted to repair military equipment, including vehicles and weapons. This tape, colored in Army-standard matte olive drab, was nicknamed "duck tape" by the soldiers. Various theories have emerged about the nickname, including its relation to cotton duck fabric, the waterproof characteristics of a duck and even the 1942 amphibious military vehicle DUKW, which was pronounced "duck."

After the war, duck tape was sold in hardware stores for household repairs. It was commonly used in construction to wrap air ducts. Following this application, the name "duct tape" came into use in the 1950s, along with tape products that were colored silvery gray like tin ductwork.

SOURCE: wikipedia.org

Duct tape history

A division of Johnson & Johnson made medical adhesive tapes from duck cloth starting in 1927. During World War II, a team developed an adhesive tape for the U.S. military intended to seal ammunition cases against moisture. The tape was required to be ripped by hand, not cut with scissors. According to Johnson & Johnson, the idea came from an ordnance factory worker - and mother of two Navy sailors - named Vesta Stoudt, who worried that problems with ammunition box seals would cost soldiers precious time in battle. She wrote to President Franklin D. Roosevelt in 1943 with the idea to seal the boxes with a fabric tape, which she had tested at her factory. The letter was forwarded to the War Production Board, who put Johnson & Johnson on the job.

The unnamed product was made of thin cotton duck tape coated in waterproof polyethylene (plastic) with a layer of rubber-based gray adhesive ("Polycoat") bonded to one side. It was easy to apply and remove and soon was adapted to repair military equipment, including vehicles and weapons. This tape, colored in Army-standard matte olive drab, was nicknamed "duck tape" by the soldiers. Various theories have emerged about the nickname, including its relation to cotton duck fabric, the waterproof characteristics of a duck and even the 1942 amphibious military vehicle DUKW, which was pronounced "duck."

After the war, duck tape was sold in hardware stores for household repairs. It was commonly used in construction to wrap air ducts. Following this application, the name "duct tape" came into use in the 1950s, along with tape products that were colored silvery gray like tin ductwork.

SOURCE: wikipedia.org

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