TABLE TALK: Colorado Springs chefs are moving from kitchen to kitchen

By Teresa Farney Published: August 2, 2013 | 12:00 am 0

Kitchen doors are swinging because local chefs are looking for greener pastures here and there.

Scott Savage, who has been the executive chef at The Cliff House at Pikes Peak, 306 Ca?n Ave. since 2001, has moved to Anaheim, Calif., to be the executive chef at a Morton's The Steakhouse. During his time overseeing the Cliff House kitchen, he was a frequent award winner at The Colorado Springs Chorale Chefs Gala. He also produced cooking demonstrations for "The Savage Kitchen" video series. Regulars will no doubt miss Savage and his creative take on the recipes he prepared.

Stepping up to fill Savage's Crocs is Justin Boudouin (pronounced bow dawn), who joined Savage as the executive sous chef in 2011. He graduated from Johnson and Wales University in Denver in 2005. He spent time in Las Vegas at the upscale Aquaknox restaurant. Then he came back to the Springs to work in the kitchens of the Penrose room and Summit at The Broadmoor before coming to The Cliff House.

Philip Meyer, who was the executive chef at Walter's Bistro, brought his knife roll to The Cliff House to become Boudouin's executive sous chef. Meyer got his training on the job at notable eateries including West Coast institutions such as Zuni Caf? Patina and Citrus.

The pastry kitchen at The Cliff House is headed up by Angela Ippolito who graduated from Le Cordon Bleu in Las Vegas. She spent time at Emeril's Table 10.

Over at Walter's Bistro, 146 E. Cheyenne Mountain Blvd., Sean Gibbons has returned as the executive chef. He had been at the eatery as the executive sous chef for seven years and left in 2011 when Steven Weber was hired as the executive chef.

Weber, a classically European-style trained chef, became the executive chef at Garden of the Gods Club in 2012. Most recently he was one of 20 chefs in Colorado Springs to be highlighted in the first edition of Best Chefs America.

Pasta plenty

If you have not attended Pasta in the Park, you should treat yourself this year. Pasta cooking teams will gather at The Myron Stratton Home Campus, 2525 S. Colorado 115, at 5:50 p.m. Aug. 10, to go ladle-to-ladle in hopes of being named Top Pasta Sauce Chef. Participants taste their way around the cooking tent and vote for their favorite sauce. Vintages Wine and Spirits pours samples to make the sauce tasting easier. As if you didn't get full doing your judging job in the cooking tent, you move to the dining tent for a dinner prepared by Cravings catering and chocolate fondue furnished by The Melting Pot. Cost is $95 per person and supports the good work of TESSA, an organization that helps children and women in abusive situations. Call 785-6833. Visit tessacs.org.

Taking a wok

New Panda 2 at 1213 N. Circle Drive has closed. The owners are moving to a new location at 1625 N. Union Blvd. Friday is the target for opening the new eatery. Call 574-8336. Visit newpandarestaurant.com.

Doomed location

Owners trying as hard as they may have not been able to make a sustainable caf?at 287 E. Fountain Blvd., including Josh Kennard, who ran the place as Lofty's for the past couple of years. It's hidden on a corner behind a condo complex on Nevada Avenue. Kennard, who co-owns Olde World Bagels & Deli, said, "I think the landlords thought that if I couldn't make it (a restaurant) a success, no one could." The space is going to be made into business offices.

"KVOR Table Talk"

Guest on the "KVOR Table Talk" radio show on 740 AM, 2 to 3 p.m. Saturday.

- J. Jones, owner of Jones Scones, talks about a varied life and career, which includes creating the creamy scone recipe, being a lawyer, a bouncer, a professional voice-over artist, a black belt in Tomiki Aikido and a colon cancer survivor. He sells his scones online and in Denver-area Whole Foods Markets and Vitamin Cottages. Call 1-303-698-9388. Visit jonesscones.com.

- Heather Twesme, owner of Heather's Apron Strings cooking school, talks about her school, which she started because friends wanted to cook like she does. She keeps the classes small, up to five. Cost is $25 per hour. Visit heathersapronstrings.com.

- Eric Hanagan, owner of Hanagan Farms and member of the Rocky Ford Growers Association, and Diane Mulligan, president of Mulligan & Co., a marketing firm that represents the Rocky Ford Growers Association, talk about measures the cantaloupe industry in Rocky Ford area is taking to overcome the negative media about the cantaloupe recall last year. They talk about area farmers, who are focusing entirely on melons this year - opting not to grow thirstier crops like wheat, soy and corn. Visit rockyfordgrowers assocation.com.

- Greg Soukup, owner of Blue Sage Caf? 5152 Centennial Blvd., talks about the Slow Food Global Dinner at 6:30 p.m. Aug. 12. Two cabritos, which are goat kids, are featured on the six-course menu. Soukup will butterfly and roast a whole goat and create other international dishes from the second kid. Seating is limited to 28 people. Cost is $35 per person. Call 593-2393. Visit thebluesagecafe.com.

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