Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

Streets, fields remain flooded in Greeley

2 photos photo - Tony Stansbury, left, and Robert Villa push a canoe with office material they recovered from DBE Manufacturing Company in Greeley, Colo., on Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Homes and businesses on the east side of Greeley were flooded as water from spring runoff makes its way down the Poudre River (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski) + caption
Tony Stansbury, left, and Robert Villa push a canoe with office material they recovered from DBE Manufacturing Company in Greeley, Colo., on Tuesday, June 3, 2014. Homes and businesses on the east side of Greeley were flooded as water from spring runoff makes its way down the Poudre River (AP Photo/Ed Andrieski)
The Associated Press Updated: June 3, 2014 at 8:08 pm 0

GREELEY — Some streets and fields remain flooded in Greeley as the spring runoff continued to push the Poudre River over its banks on Tuesday.

The water reached 9.16 feet, over a foot above flood stage, around midday. That's just above the previous crest record for the river set in 2010, the National Weather Service said.

The flooding was making it harder to drive around the city, although some drivers disregarded warnings to stay off closed roads.

Two homes were flooded this week, forcing those residents to evacuate, Greeley street superintendent Jerry Pickett said. Across the flooded street, other residents sat on the porch of a home surrounded by sandbags.

Nearby, Tony Stansbury and Robert Villa waded through waist-deep water with a canoe to recover records from DBE Manufacturing & Supply.

The Greeley Tribune reported Greeley City Councilman Charlie Archibeque caught a 10-pound carp in the driveway of his home, which was surrounded by water.

The water has been high along the Poudre for a week and levels of waterways around the state are expected to remain high for another two weeks or so as the plentiful mountain snowpack melts and fills reservoirs.

"The good news is there's water to be had but it could be a nuisance for another few weeks," National Weather Service forecaster Kyle Fredin said.

The South Platte Basin, which includes the Poudre, was listed as being nearly 300 percent of its average level as of last week.

In western Colorado, the spring runoff was creating a wave known as "Big Sur" in the Colorado River, drawing kayakers and paddle boarders to DeBeque Canyon.

The Daily Sentinel reports that the wave develops when water flows over a submerged bridge reach at least 20,000 cubic feet per second. The last time the wave appeared was in 2011.

Things are much drier in the state's southeastern and southwestern corners, where fire and blowing dust warnings were posted Tuesday.

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