Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

Soda sales in US decline at faster pace

By: CANDICE CHOI The Associated Press
April 1, 2014 Updated: April 1, 2014 at 8:45 am
0
photo - FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014 file photo, thousands of empty and crushed soda cans build up on a conveyer belt near the end of the line at Tennis Sanitation in Saint Paul Park, Minn. Americans cut back on soda again in 2013, extending a trend that began nearly a decade ago. U.S. sales volume of carbonated soft drinks fell 3 percent in 2013, according to an annual report by Beverage Digest, an industry tracker.  (AP Photo/The St. Paul Pioneer Press, John Doman)  MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE OUT
FILE - In this Feb. 11, 2014 file photo, thousands of empty and crushed soda cans build up on a conveyer belt near the end of the line at Tennis Sanitation in Saint Paul Park, Minn. Americans cut back on soda again in 2013, extending a trend that began nearly a decade ago. U.S. sales volume of carbonated soft drinks fell 3 percent in 2013, according to an annual report by Beverage Digest, an industry tracker. (AP Photo/The St. Paul Pioneer Press, John Doman) MINNEAPOLIS STAR TRIBUNE OUT 

NEW YORK - Americans cut back on soda at an accelerated pace last year, underscoring the difficulties Coca-Cola and PepsiCo face in winning back customers.

U.S. sales volume of carbonated soft drinks fell 3 percent in 2013, extending a streak of declines that began nearly a decade ago. It also represents a steeper drop than the 1.2 percent decline in 2012 and the 1 percent drop in 2011, according to an annual report by Beverage Digest, an industry tracker.

Carbonated soft drinks still represent the biggest category in the beverage industry. But the popularity of longtime favorites like Coke, Pepsi and Dr Pepper is waning as a growing number of alternatives like flavored waters and energy drinks pop up in beverage aisles.

Soda has also been under fire from public health advocates for fueling weight gain.

Even diet sodas are suffering. Last year, for instance, Diet Coke's sales volume declined 6.8 percent, compared to a 0.5 percent drop for regular Coke, according to Beverage Digest. Diet Pepsi declined 6.9 percent, compared to a 3.6 percent decline for regular Pepsi.

Industry executives blame the trend in diet sodas on worries people have about artificial sweeteners.

But diet sodas are also facing intensifying competition from the proliferation of lower-calorie alternatives, many of which are made with artificial sweeteners as well. Sparkling Ice, a small brand owned by TalkingRain, for instance, last year saw sales more than double, according to IRI, a Chicago-based market research firm.

Overall, Coca-Cola, which also owns Sprite and Fanta, saw its soda volume fall 2.2 percent.

PepsiCo, which makes Mountain Dew, saw volume fall 4.4 percent. That was despite the company's stepped up marketing for its flagship soda, including sponsorship of the Super Bowl halftime show for the past two years.

Coca-Cola and PepsiCo both make an array of other beverages, including bottled water, orange juice and sports drinks. But sodas still account for a large and lucrative portion of their businesses, and executives have expressed determination in getting sales volume back on the path to growth.

Dan Schafer, a spokesman for Coca-Cola, said the Atlanta company was "committed to returning our overall sparkling business to growth in the U.S."

A representative for PepsiCo of Purchase, N.Y., didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

or
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 
This is your last FREE article for the month
This is your last FREE article for the month

Subscribe now and enjoy Unlimited Digital Access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
You have reached your article limit for the month
You have reached your article limit for the month

We hope that you've enjoyed your complimentary access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 

Exclusive Subscriber Content

You read The Gazette because you care about your community and the local stories you can't find anywhere else.

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber? Get Access | Already a digital subscriber? Log In
 
articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.