Search is on for restaurant(s) to take over Giuseppe's space downtown

By Ned Hunter Updated: December 5, 2013 at 8:01 am • Published: December 4, 2013 | 7:35 pm 0

Wanted: A restaurant - or maybe two - to occupy a former railroad depot that once housed a landmark Italian eatery in downtown Colorado Springs.

Owners of the Old Depot Square have started marketing the former Giuseppe's Old Depot Restaurant space at 10 S. Sierra Madre St. in hopes of attracting a nationally known or local restaurateur.

"All of the restaurant equipment is still in there and has been maintained and is working," said Tiffany Colvert, commercial broker with NAI Highland, which started marketing the building Monday. "So, a new user could come in and start up tomorrow."

Giuseppe's closed in October 2011 after 38 years in business. The Ochs family, which bought the landmark building from the Denver and Rio Grande Railroad on its 100-year anniversary, used the space as an events center until January, said Harlan Ochs, who co-owns the building with his brother, Don.

"But we did not want to continue that," he said. "We wanted a better long-term use for the property."

Now, the Ochs family hopes to bring in another restaurant. Ochs said that, after Giuseppe's closed, his company received several inquiries into leasing the space, but each prospect wanted to divide the 13,600 square-foot space into smaller areas - something the Ochs have not wanted to do before now.

"But now we will consider it," Ochs said.

The space is for lease, not for sale, Colvert said. She said the lease price could range from $12 a square foot to $16 a square foot, "depending on the tenant." The property is inside the El Paso County Enterprise Zone, so those who lease space could qualify for various tax and other incentives, she said.

Giuseppe's was in a space that was added onto the original stone building, which still houses several businesses, Colvert said. The property, which includes two buildings, totals 36,946 square feet.

The Ochs brothers - Don, Harlan, Ken and Larry - bought the train depot from the railroad in September 1971, the same year it ended passenger service to the city, Harlan said.

"The depot was the first view for thousands of people coming into the city," said Harlan, who, with Don, has survived his two other brothers.

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