Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

Red Cross Hometown Hero: Fort Carson private's farm training kicks in for baby delivery

March 17, 2015 Updated: March 17, 2015 at 5:38 am
0
photo - Pfc. Laryn Rodgers holds two-month-old Giovanni Marciano Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Rodgers delivered Giovanni at Fort Carson Gate 20 to parents Lindsay Marciano, far right, and Sgt. Dominik Marciano on January 15, 2015 when Lindsay went into labor far from the hospital and with no ambulance near. Michael Ciaglo, The Gazette
Pfc. Laryn Rodgers holds two-month-old Giovanni Marciano Wednesday, March 11, 2015. Rodgers delivered Giovanni at Fort Carson Gate 20 to parents Lindsay Marciano, far right, and Sgt. Dominik Marciano on January 15, 2015 when Lindsay went into labor far from the hospital and with no ambulance near. Michael Ciaglo, The Gazette 

Sometimes Army training just isn't enough.

Pfc. Laryn Rodgers, though, had something else to fall back on as she dealt with a crisis at a Fort Carson gate on Jan. 14.

Farm Girl Training.

The 20-year-old member of the post's 984th Military Police Company was working at the post's busiest gate off Interstate 25 that night when she relied on her youth on a farm to deliver a 7-pound, 4-ounce baby boy in a frantic soldier's car.

"She looked at me and said, 'Let's do this'," said the proud father, Sgt. Dominik Marciano, who nominated Rodgers for the Pikes Peak Red Cross Hometown Heroes 2015 military award that she earned for delivering Giovanni at Fort Carson's gate 20.

As is the case in many pregnancies, Giovanni's entry into the world started with a couple of false alarms. Nurses had advised his mother, Lindsay Marciano, to wait a couple of hours for labor to take hold before she went to the hospital again.

It turns out that Giovanni, the Marciano's second child, wasn't that patient.

Dominik packed his wife into a car and dashed for Fort Carson's Evans Army Community Hospital when it became evident the baby wouldn't wait.

"I got a call for a 911 hangup on our radio," Rodgers said.

That hangup call was from Sgt. Marciano who wanted to summon medical help to the gate at Colorado 16 and Interstate 25, where he arrived moments later, hazard lights flashing and horn honking.

Rodgers, who joined the Army in 2013, spotted the car and sensed the fear.

"At that point in time, we realized it was serious," she said.

But it was nothing a girl raised on a farm in the Wabash Valley near Mount Carmel, Ill., couldn't handle.

Rodgers had been bringing new life into the world since childhood - no humans but plenty of livestock including kids and colts.

That rural confidence helped Sgt. Marciano, an Afghanistan veteran, relax.

"It kind of made me feel better," he said of the demeanor of the diminutive private who took charge.

Moments later, Giovanni, 3-year-old Kinsley's baby brother, made his appearance.

"She coached us through," Sgt. Marciano said of Rodgers. "She knew what to do."

The birth was quickly followed by a new panic. The baby wasn't crying and was turning blue.

Rodgers used a pinkie finger to sweep the baby's month and massaged his chest to encourage a first breath. She had no medical gear for pediatric care, and the baby still wasn't crying.

Rodgers realized what had to be done, and Giovanni got his first kiss from a stranger.

"I sucked the mucus out of his mouth and nose," Rodgers said.

As the baby wailed, medical help arrived. Giovanni and Lindsay were pronounced fit and healthy at the hospital.

Sgt. Marciano got a son and a new hero out of the ordeal.

"She was so calm," he said of Rodgers.

The tie to Giovanni has made Rodgers a minor celebrity at the post.

When she's checking identification at Fort Carson's gates drivers sometimes ask, "Are you the Pfc. who delivered the baby?"

Rodgers doesn't covet the fame, but says she'll always remember Giovanni's arrival.

"It was the coolest thing ever," she said.

As for the steely demeanor and easy skill she showed in the crisis, Rodgers knows who to credit.

"I grew up on a farm," she said. "I have my mom and dad to thank for that."

-

Contact Tom Roeder: 636-0240

Twitter @xroederx

Comment Policy
Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

Some news is free.
Exceptional journalism takes time, effort and your support.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.