Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

Psyche-metal band Caustic Casanova makes some noise in Colorado Springs

September 1, 2016 Updated: September 1, 2016 at 8:19 am
0
Caption +
Psyche-metal band Caustic Casanova plays at the Triple Nickel Tavern on Wednesday. Courtesy.

Wednesday, Triple Nickel Tavern, 26 S. Wahsatch Ave.; 477-9555, triplenickeltavern.com

----

When Stefanie Zaenker heard a drummer play at a middle school student assembly she was obsessed.

For years she begged her mom for a drum kit and lessons but was denied. Finally her wish came true and then some.

"When I was 16 my mom buckled and got me a few lessons in the summer," Zaenker says. "I took five. Everything else has been learning from experience from being in Caustic Casanova."

The heavy rock band plays Wednesday at the Triple Nickel Tavern. They're touring in support of their third album, last year's "Breaks."

The trio are often lumped into the psyche-metal genre - the Indy Week in Durham, N.C., called them "absurdly muscled uber-psyche."

"It's psychedelic rock but combined with heavy metal," says bassist and lead vocalist Francis Beringer. "Psyche-metal has a lot of songs with a lot of delay, reverb, space filling, atmospheric stuff. It's stuff that goes back to Pink Floyd, Jimi Hendrix. We load it with a lot of extreme volume and vigorous heavy metal riffs."

The group was founded in 2005 by Beringer and another student at the College of William and Mary in Williamsburg, Va. They tried a couple of drummers who didn't work out and put up a brief post on Facebook looking for somebody. Zaenker, also a student at the college, happened to see it right before they pulled it down, auditioned and got the gig when she was 18. She also sings vocals from behind the drums, something that takes quite a bit of rehearsal, she says.

Their first album "Imminent Eminence" was released in 2008 and "Someday You Will Be Proven Correct" in 2012 before their guitarist left. Beringer and Zaenker tried to make it as a duo but eventually decided to search for a replacement guitarist. They found him - Andrew Yonki, longtime fan and friend - and what was already a noisy band got even louder.

"My guitar playing style is a lot bigger and in your face than Michael's (original guitar player) style," Yonki says. "I come from a punk rock and heavy metal background, like almost more on the indie side of things. I'm not afraid to bash the (expletive) out of my guitar and point my amp in your face. I'm not afraid to blow your ear drums."

JENNIFER MULSON, THE GAZETTE, 636-0270, JEN.MULSON@GAZETTE.COM

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

Some news is free.
Exceptional journalism takes time, effort and your support.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.