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New Colorado law mandates students must be told about skilled labor, military careers

By: Monte Whaley, The Denver Post
August 10, 2017 Updated: August 10, 2017 at 7:35 am
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photo - DENVER, CO - JUNE 12: Pinnacle Constructors ironworker Clint Wilhelm grinding before welding steel at 1670 Broadway as the "TIAA building" is refreshing its street presence. The glass atrium is gone, and they're replacing it with a four-story building that will house a ground-floor TIAA retail space, fitness center, expanding dining space for the building's cafeteria and a rooftop deck. June 12, 2017 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Joe Amon/The Denver Post)
DENVER, CO - JUNE 12: Pinnacle Constructors ironworker Clint Wilhelm grinding before welding steel at 1670 Broadway as the "TIAA building" is refreshing its street presence. The glass atrium is gone, and they're replacing it with a four-story building that will house a ground-floor TIAA retail space, fitness center, expanding dining space for the building's cafeteria and a rooftop deck. June 12, 2017 in Denver, Colorado. (Photo by Joe Amon/The Denver Post) 

A law that took effect Wednesday mandates that Colorado public schools must inform high school students that not all post-secondary paths lead to college.

School counselors also must tell students about jobs as skilled laborers and military personnel.

“A four-year college degree may be a good fit for some,” said Phil Covarrubias, the Brighton Republican and owner of an excavation company who sponsored House Bill 1041. “But I want students to know that there’s great opportunity in trade schools and through military service that doesn’t require the enormous cost of tuition at universities.”

The bill requires that each student’s Individual Career and Academic Plan include information about the various career pathways available to them and the types of certificates and jobs to which each pathway leads.

Read full story at The Denver Post.

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