MORNING ROUNDUP: Authorities say Colorado a major exporter of pot

The Associated Press and The Gazette Updated: August 2, 2013 at 8:27 am • Published: August 2, 2013 0

DENVER (AP) — Authorities say Colorado is becoming a major exporter of illegally grown marijuana to the rest of the country.

The Rocky Mountain High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area, a network of law enforcement organizations in four western states that share information on drug-running patterns, say there were at least 270 highway seizures of marijuana last year that investigators linked to Colorado.

The Denver Post reports (http://tinyurl.com/ov3oudb) some of the marijuana was diverted from medical-marijuana dispensaries.


AROUND COLORADO

Bicycle race volunteers get anti-terror training

ASPEN, Colo. (AP) — Hundreds of volunteers needed for the USA Pro Challenge cycling race in Aspen will get mandatory training that includes terrorism alerts.

Aspen Police Department spokesman Blair Weyer says it stems from the bombings at the Boston Marathon, where two pressure cookers were used to make bombs that exploded near the finish line. The bombs killed three people and injured more than 260 people.

The Aspen Times reports (http://tinyurl.com/l6z3xss) training for the Aspen volunteers for the event that begins Aug. 19 will include how to recognize suspicious packages and the proper way to report their concerns.


1 dead, 1 injured in Glenwood Springs shooting

GLENWOOD SPRINGS, Colo. (AP) — Garfield County sheriff's officials say a 39-year-old man who was sought after a fatal shooting in Glenwood Springs has turned himself in.

The man, who is being called the primary suspect, was being held Thursday evening in Mesa County.

Garfield County Sheriff's Office spokesman Walt Stowe says the suspect was sought after two people were shot late Wednesday night at the Riverside Cottages. One later died, and the other was taken to a hospital in Denver.

The names of the victims haven't been released.

Sheriff's officials didn't immediately say where the suspect lives or whether he knew the victims.


Theater shooting suspect's dating profile at issue

CENTENNIAL, Colo. (AP) — The judge in the Colorado theater shooting case says prosecutors can present evidence involving the suspect's memberships on two dating websites.

James Holmes has pleaded not guilty by reason of insanity to charges alleging he killed 12 people and injured 70 at an Aurora movie theater on July 20, 2012. His trial is scheduled for February.

Prosecutors say Holmes put up profiles in 2012 on Adultfriendfinder.com and Match.com that had the tagline, "Will you visit me in prison," and could indicate his mental state.

Holmes' attorneys argued that the information was irrelevant and potentially prejudicial, especially without confirmation of the taglines' meaning and intent or who wrote them.

Judge Carlos A. Samour Jr. ruled Thursday that the information can be introduced, and jurors can decide what weight to give it.


HAPPENINGS
-- Summer Reading Party children’s program, 10 a.m.-noon, Fountain Library Branch, 230 S. Main St., Fountain, free.
-- First Friday Art Walk with silent auction to benefit Silver Key Senior Services, 5-8 p.m., Aha & Kreuser Gallery, 218 W. Colorado Ave.
-- UVC Summer Concert Series, 6 p.m., University Village Colorado Shopping Center, 5230 N. Nevada Ave., free.


TODAY IN HISTORY
In 1776, members of the Continental Congress began attaching their signatures to the Declaration of Independence.
In 1862, the Ambulance Corps for the Army of the Potomac was created at the order of Maj. Gen. George McClellan during the Civil War.
In 1876, frontiersman “Wild Bill” Hickok was shot and killed while playing poker at a saloon in Deadwood, Dakota Territory, by Jack McCall, who was hanged.
In 1909, the original Lincoln “wheat” penny first went into circulation.
In 1922, Alexander Graham Bell, generally regarded as the inventor of the telephone, died at age 75 in Nova Scotia, Canada.
In 1923, the 29th president of the United States, Warren G. Harding, died in San Francisco; Vice President Calvin Coolidge became president.
In 1934, German President Paul von Hindenburg died, paving the way for Adolf Hitler’s takeover.
In 1943, during World War II, U.S. Navy boat PT-109, commanded by Lt. (jg) John F. Kennedy, sank after being rammed in the middle of the night by the Japanese destroyer Amagiri off the Solomon Islands. Two crew members were killed; Kennedy led the survivors to nearby islands until they could be rescued.
In 1945, President Harry S. Truman, Soviet leader Josef Stalin and British Prime Minister Clement Attlee concluded the Potsdam conference.
In 1974, former White House counsel John W. Dean III was sentenced to one to four years in prison for obstruction of justice in the Watergate coverup. (Dean ended up serving four months.)
In 1985, 135 people were killed when a Delta Air Lines jetliner crashed while attempting to land at Dallas-Fort Worth International Airport.
In 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait, seizing control of the oil-rich emirate. (The Iraqis were driven out in Operation Desert Storm.)
Ten years ago: Saddam Hussein’s two elder sons and a grandson were buried as martyrs near the deposed Iraqi leader’s hometown of Tikrit, where insurgents afterward attacked U.S. troops with three remote-controlled bombs.
Five years ago: Police in southern Afghanistan reported a bus carrying a wedding party had struck a mine, killing 10 people, including the bride and groom.
One year ago: Kofi Annan resigned as peace envoy to Syria, issuing a blistering critique of world powers.

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