Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

More Movers-and-shakers Articles

Redrawing America Imbalance of Power
FILE - In this Tuesday, Feb. 16, 2016 file photo, Republican state Sens. Dan Soucek, left, and Brent Jackson, right, review historical maps during The Senate Redistricting Committee for the 2016 Extra Session in the Legislative Office Building at the N.C. General Assembly, in Raleigh, N.C. An Associated Press analysis, using a new statistical method of calculating partisan advantage, finds traditional battlegrounds such as Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Florida and Virginia were among those with significant Republican advantages in their U.S. or state House races in 2016. (Corey Lowenstein/The News & Observer, File via AP)
Redrawing America Imbalance of Power Unopposed
FILE - In this Monday, Jan. 9, 2017 file photo, Georgia House Speaker David Ralston, center, is greeted on the House floor on the first day of the legislative session in Atlanta. In 2017, Georgia Republicans sought to change the boundaries of several state House districts, including a couple won by Republicans by single-digit margins last November. Some of the proposed shifts sought to move heavily black precincts _ where voters overwhelmingly support Democrats _ from Republican-held districts into ones occupied by Democrats. Although the bill passed the House, it died in the Senate. Ralston has said lawmakers were merely “trying to put communities of interest together.” (AP Photo/David Goldman, File)
Redrawing America Imbalance of Power Methodology
FILE - This Dec. 12, 2012 file photo shows the state capitol building in Lansing, Mich. An Associated Press analysis, using a new statistical method of calculating partisan advantage, finds traditional battlegrounds such as Michigan, North Carolina, Pennsylvania, Wisconsin, Florida and Virginia were among those with significant Republican advantages in their U.S. or state House races in 2016. (AP Photo/Carlos Osorio, File)
Koch Donors
FILE- In this March 8, 2017, file photo, Americans for Prosperity President Tim Phillips, accompanied by FreedomWorks President Adam Brandon, speaks to members of the media outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington. Chief lieutenants in the Koch brothers’ political network lashed out at the Senate Republican health care bill on Saturday, June 24, becoming a powerful outside critic as GOP leaders try to rally support for their plan among rank-and-file Republicans. “This Senate bill needs to get better,” said Phillips. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
Koch Donors
FILE- In this March 8, 2017, file photo, Americans for Prosperity President Tim Phillips, accompanied by FreedomWorks President Adam Brandon, speaks to members of the media outside the West Wing of the White House in Washington. Chief lieutenants in the Koch brothers’ political network lashed out at the Senate Republican health care bill on Saturday, June 24, becoming a powerful outside critic as GOP leaders try to rally support for their plan among rank-and-file Republicans. “This Senate bill needs to get better,” said Phillips. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)