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Trump EPA
FILE - In this Tuesday, April 3, 2018, file photo, Environmental Protection Agency Administrator Scott Pruitt attends a news conference at the EPA in Washington, on his decision to scrap Obama administration fuel standards. The fossil-fuels lobbyist tied to the bargain-priced Capitol Hill condo leased by Pruitt is taking early retirement as a result of the scandal. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik, File)
Plane Accidents Flying Again
FILE- In this July 19, 1989, file photo, guardsman Dennis Nielsen carries passenger Spencer Bailey away from the wreckage of United Airlines Flight 232 after the plane crashed at Sioux Gateway Airport in Sioux City, Iowa. Can you fly again? It’s a question facing survivors of this week’s Southwest Airlines accident, which killed one passenger and forced an emergency landing in Philadelphia. (Gary Anderson/Sioux City Journal via AP, File)
Global Finance
International Monetary Fund (IMF) Governors gather for a group photo during World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings in Washington, Saturday, April 21, 2018. ( AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Global Finance
International Monetary Fund (IMF) Managing Director Christine Lagarde accompanied by (IMFC) Chair and South Africa's Reserve Bank Governor Lesetja Kganyagothey attend the International Monetary and Financial Committee (IMFC) conference during the World Bank/IMF Spring Meetings, in Washington, Saturday, April 21, 2018. (AP Photo/Jose Luis Magana)
Walmart Cosmopolitan
FILE - This June 1, 2017, file photo, shows a Walmart sign at a store in Hialeah Gardens, Fla. Walmart is testing a new dress code that gives employees more freedom. Under the pilot program at less than 100 stores, workers can wear solid color blue jeans instead of khaki-colored or black denim pants. They also can wear a solid-color shirt of their choosing instead of solid blue or white shirts.(AP Photo/Alan Diaz, File)
After Facebook-Who’s Next
This photo combo of images shows, clockwise, from upper left: a Google sign, the Twitter app, YouTube TV logo and the Facebook app. Facebook has taken the lion's share of scrutiny from Congress and the media for its data-handling practices that allow savvy marketers and political agents to target specific audiences, but it's far from alone. YouTube, Google and Twitter also have giant platforms awash in more videos, posts and pages than any set of human eyes could ever check. Their methods of serving ads against this sea of content may come under the microscope next. (AP Photo)
Uranium Plant Cleanup-Robot
In this photo made on Wednesday, April 4, 2018, David Kohandash, left, and Mohammad Mousaei work on the RadPiper robot in the robotics institute at Carnegie-Mellon University in Pittsburgh. The mechanism is designed to measure potentially hazardous radiation is intended to go through pipes at a former uranium plant being cleaned up in southern Ohio. (AP Photo/Keith Srakocic)
Museum Police Training Exhibit
In this April 12, 2018, photo, people look at an interactive exhibit at the Crime Lab Experience in the Mob Museum in Las Vegas. For years the museum has showcased the area's storied past in organized crime, but visitors can now also enjoy a speakeasy, a use of deadly force training experience, and an interactive crime lab exhibit. (AP Photo/John Locher)
Private Airport
In this April 11, 2018 photo, Brett Smith, CEO of Propeller Airports, left, talks with project engineer Todd Raynes, right, inside the privately-run commercial U.S. airport terminal Smith's company is building at Paine Field in Everett, Wash. Propeller Airports sold $50 million in bonds earlier this year to finance the construction, according to data obtained by The Associated Press. The terminal has commitments from Alaska Airlines, Southwest Airlines and United Airlines for up to 24 daily flights, mostly to destinations in the West and Midwest. (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren)