More Movers-and-shakers Articles

Republicans Health Care
In this March 28, 2017, photo, Mary Broecker, 76, speaks during an interview in LaGrange, Ky., at a coffee shop on Main Street, where trains run right through the middle of town. She is president of The Oldham County Republican Women’s Club, and has unbending support for Rep. Thomas Massie, R-Ky., who famously changed his vote against the AHCA from “No” to “Hell No.” Defying President Donald Trump on the Republican Party’s promise to repeal and replace Obamacare sounds like political suicide, especially in the congressional districts Trump won handily. But some Republicans who blocked the legislation won praise from constituents for stopping what many saw as a flawed plan, either in the legislation’s substance or strategy. (AP Photo/Dylan T. Lovan)
AP Poll Health Overhaul
President Donald Trump listens in the Cabinet Room of the White House in Washington, Wednesday, March 29, 2017. Sixty-two percent of Americans turned thumbs down on Trump’s handling of health care during the initial weeks of his presidency, according to a poll by The Associated Press-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research. It was his worst rating among seven issues the poll tested, which included the economy, foreign policy and immigration. (AP Photo/Evan Vucci)
Trump Budget Health
Health and Human Services Secretary Tom Price, a doctor and former congressman, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 29, 2017, before a House Appropriations subcommittee hearing to outline the Trump Administration's proposals to trim the HHS budget. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
New MS Drug
This photo provided by Genentech shows the company's drug Ocrevus. Late Tuesday, March 28, 2017, the Food and Drug Administration approved Ocrevus, the first drug for an aggressive kind of multiple sclerosis that steadily reduces coordination and the ability to walk. While there are more than a dozen treatments for the most common form of MS, there's been nothing specifically for people with the type called primary progressive MS. That type of MS is relatively rare, affecting about 50,000 Americans. Ocrevus was also approved for relapsing forms of MS, which progress more slowly. (Genentech via AP)
Trump Budget
FILE - In this March 16, 2017 file photo, copies of President Donald Trump's first budget are displayed at the Government Printing Office in Washington. resident Donald Trump is proposing immediate budget cuts of $18 billion from programs like medical research, infrastructure and community grants so U.S. taxpayers, not Mexico, can cover the downpayment on the border wall. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)
Protecting Female Athletes
former Team USA gymnast Jeanette Antolin, right, accompanied by Sen. Susan Collins, R-Maine, left, and Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif., ranking member on the Senate Judiciary Committee, speaks during a news conference on Capitol Hill in Washington, Tuesday, March 28, 2017, to call on Congress to pass legislation that would require amateur athletics governing bodies to immediately report sex-abuse allegations to law enforcement and strengthen oversight of member gymnasiums and coaches. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite)
Health Overhaul Birth Control
FILE - In this Wednesday, March 8, 2017, file photo, Maryland House Speaker Michael Busch speaks at a news conference in Annapolis, Md., in support of legislation to continue funding for services provided by Planned Parenthood. Democratic lawmakers in some states including Maryland are pressing ahead with efforts to protect birth control access, Planned Parenthood funding and abortion coverage in case they are jeopardized in the future. (AP Photo/Brian Witte, File)
Opioid Democratic Inquiry
FILE - In this March 14, 2017 file photo, Sen. Claire McCaskill, D-Mo. listens on Capitol Hill in Washington. McCaskill is seeking marketing information, sales records and studies from manufacturers of the top-selling opioid products in the United States to determine whether drugmakers have contributed to an overuse of the pain killers. (AP Photo/J. Scott Applewhite, File)