Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

'Me, Myself and I' best TV pilot this fall

September 24, 2017 Updated: September 24, 2017 at 9:35 am
0
Caption +
ME, MYSELF & I stars Bobby Moynihan (left) in a comedy about the defining moments in one man\'s life over three distinct periods -- as 14-year-old Alex in 1991, Alex at age 40 in present day (Moynihan) and Alex at age 65 in 2042. Jaleel White (right) plays Alex\'s best friend and business partner, Darryl, in present day. This fall, ME, MYSELF & I will be broadcast Mondays (9:30-10:00 PM, ET/PT). After football ends, as of Oct. 30 ME, MYSELF & I will shift to (9:00-9:30 PM, ET/PT), on the CBS Television Network. Photo: Neil Jacobs/CBS ©2016 CBS Broadcasting, Inc. All Rights Reserved

Cast: Bobby Moynihan ("Saturday Night Live"), John Larroquette ("Night Court," "The Librarians"), Jack Dylan Grazer ("It," "Tales of Halloween"), Jaleel White ("Family Matters"), Brian Unger ("It's Always Sunny in Philadelphia"), Sharon Lawrence ("NYPD Blue," "Desperate Housewives), Kelen Coleman ("The Office," "The Newsroom")

Airs: The season premiere airs on CBS at 8:30 p.m. Monday.

The premise: This comedy focuses on the defining moments in Alex Riley's life over three periods: as a 14-year-old in 1991, at age 40 in the present, and at age 65 in 2042. Helping Alex along the way is his loving daughter, his thoughtful step-dad and his best friend/business partner.

Highs: Of all the TV pilots this fall, none resonated more for me than this one. Plot lines from each period of Alex's life are purposeful and provide a comprehensive look at a fascinating character you won't see in most sitcoms. In many ways, "Me, Myself and I" reminds me of "The Wonder Years," if viewers were able to see Kevin Arnold through phases in his life.

The series starts with an introduction to 14-year-old Alex (Jack Dylan Grazer). He's a Chicago kid who loves Michael Jordan and is being raised by a single mother. His life is turned upside down when his flight attendant mom marries a pilot from Los Angeles and they move to California. Next we meet 40-year-old Alex (Bobby Moynihan), an inventor whose life has fallen apart after he catches his wife cheating on him. Finally, viewers see 65-year-old Alex (John Larroquette), a successful businessman recovering from a near-fatal heart attack.

Alex experiences some of his life's most defining moments in these three periods. What makes all three versions so fun to watch is his personal philosophy: "Our life's stories aren't defined by the things that happen to us, they're defined by how we choose to deal with them."

People of all ages can identify with Alex's problems. The challenges of parenting, the difficulties of fitting in, coping with loss, the heartbreak of divorce, not being able to get out of a rut, and how to find happiness are some serious topics. But "Me, Myself and I" tackles all these with grace and humor.

To be sure, Alex has his faults. He bashes in a car window, doubts himself when he shouldn't, and can act impulsively. That said, he's about as likable as a character can get. You'll want to root for Alex because he's incredibly relatable.

Lows: TV pilots are tricky. Rarely do they feel complete. The premiere of "Me, Myself and I" is that rare exception. From start to finish, the first episode told a complete story that had me invested. It was great. But where does the show go from here? Almost every thread connecting each of Alex's timelines seemed to have been tied together by the end of the episode. Does this series, which starts so strong, have more engaging stories to share? Only time will tell.

Grade: (A-): This series had two strikes against it before I watched the pilot. First, the title seemed gimmicky. Second, I find most CBS sitcoms trite and derivative. But this show is a home run. "Me, Myself and I" is funny yet touching. Easily my favorite new comedy in years, this series might just be the "This is Us" of sitcoms.

-

Gazette media columnist Terry Terrones is a member of the Television Critics Association and the Broadcast Television Journalists Association. You can follow him on Twitter at @terryterrones.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 
This is your last FREE article for the month
This is your last FREE article for the month

Subscribe now and enjoy Unlimited Digital Access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
You have reached your article limit for the month
You have reached your article limit for the month

We hope that you've enjoyed your complimentary access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.