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Louisville rocked by 52 overdose calls in just 32 hours

By: Jason Cherkis, The Huffington Post
February 11, 2017 Updated: February 11, 2017 at 11:36 am
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photo - FILE- In this Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014, file photograph, a small bottle of the opiate overdose treatment drug, naloxone, also known by its brand name Narcan, is displayed at the South Jersey AIDS Alliance in Atlantic City, N.J. It is becoming easier for friends and family of heroin users or patients abusing strong prescription painkillers to get access to naloxone, a powerful, life-saving antidote, as state lawmakers loosen restrictions on the medicine to fight a growing epidemic. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File)
FILE- In this Wednesday, Feb. 19, 2014, file photograph, a small bottle of the opiate overdose treatment drug, naloxone, also known by its brand name Narcan, is displayed at the South Jersey AIDS Alliance in Atlantic City, N.J. It is becoming easier for friends and family of heroin users or patients abusing strong prescription painkillers to get access to naloxone, a powerful, life-saving antidote, as state lawmakers loosen restrictions on the medicine to fight a growing epidemic. (AP Photo/Mel Evans, File) 

Louisville, Kentucky, has seen an alarming spike in drug overdoses in recent days. According to The Courier-Journal newspaper, first responders took on 52 calls for overdoses in the 32 hours from 12:01 a.m. Thursday until 8 a.m. Friday. One overdose was fatal.

The high number of overdoses isn’t new to Louisville and the surrounding county. Jefferson County had been averaging 22 overdoses a day this year. There have already been 695 overdoses through the first month of 2017, according to The Courier-Journal.

Of the 52 calls, 34 overdose victims were rushed to emergency rooms. A spokesperson for emergency services personnel described the overdoses as the “same old, same old.” The majority of the overdoses were caused by heroin or medications.

Lexington, Kentucky, is facing the same stubborn opioid crisis. A recent news account noted that there were 134 overdose deaths in the city in 2015 and by November of 2016, the city had reach the same death toll. First responders had dispensed 1,550 doses of naloxone, which counters the effects of opioid overdoses, in 2016.

Read more at the The Huffington Post

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