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  • Colleges getting out of health insurance business

    SEATTLE (AP) — The federal health care overhaul is leading some colleges and universities to get out of the health insurance business. Experts are divided on whether this change will be good or bad for students. Some call it an inevitable result of health care reform and a money-saver for students since insurance in the marketplace is usually...

  • Attorneys: Sterilizations were part of plea deal talks

    NASHVILLE, Tenn. (AP) — Nashville prosecutors have made sterilization of women part of plea negotiations at least four times in the past five years, and the district attorney has banned his staff from using the invasive surgery as a bargaining chip after the latest case. In the most recent case, first reported by The Tennessean, a woman with a...

  • Guinea deploys police as Sierra Leoneans flee Ebola lockdown

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Guinea has deployed security forces to the country's southwest in response to reports that Sierra Leoneans are crossing the border to flee an Ebola lockdown intended to stamp out the deadly disease, an official said Saturday. The deployment, led by the head of the national gendarmerie, was sent late Friday night...

  • In Tallahassee, there's a low-profile push for child welfare

    TALLAHASSEE, Fla. (AP) — In a state legislative session preoccupied with gambling, guns, booze and tax cuts, the Children's Movement of Florida is pushing a cause that gets little attention: health care and early education for children from poor families. It may not draw high-powered lobbyists to the Capitol rotunda, but Vance Aloupis,...

  • Rockingham County gets top health rating; Coos is last

    CONCORD, N.H. (AP) — A new report once again ranks Rockingham County as New Hampshire's healthiest, while Coos County remains at the bottom of the list. The sixth annual report released this week by the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the University of Wisconsin Population Health Institute rates counties nationwide in two categories —...

  • New England editorial roundup

    The Providence (R.I.) Journal, March 26, 2015 Pete Rose has re-applied for reinstatement to baseball, and Rob Manfred, Major League Baseball's new commissioner, has agreed to meet privately with him. Manfred has also said he would be open to considering legalized gambling on the game, a very ominous development. We sincerely hope these are not...

  • Medicaid expansion enrollment soars; waiver hurdle remains

    LANSING, Mich. (AP) — Mary Amick went 15 years without health insurance while working a minimum-wage job at a small country store outside Coldwater. She sometimes visited a free clinic but mostly put off addressing her medical ailments, needing to buy food and pay utility bills instead. But not long after hurting her shoulder in a fall last...

  • Sierra Leoneans to stay home in final push to stop Ebola

    FREETOWN, Sierra Leone (AP) — Sierra Leone's 6 million people were told to stay home for three days beginning Friday, except for religious services, as the West African nation attempted a final push to rid itself of Ebola. Thousands of teams were out reminding people how Ebola is spread and how to prevent it. Teams were also going to search...

  • House Democrats feature education, mental health in budget

    OLYMPIA, Wash. (AP) — Highlights from the $38.8 billion state operating budget for 2016-17 unveiled by Democratic leaders of Washington's House of Representatives Friday morning: —K-12 EDUCATION: The proposed budget spends $3.2 billion more on K-12 education than the previous two-year budget, but about $1.5 billion of that is new spending,...

  • Bill would require immunization opt-outs to be notarized

    HARTFORD, Conn. (AP) — Connecticut parents and guardians who want their children exempted from certain immunizations would need their wishes to be notarized under proposed legislation. Hartford Rep. Matthew Ritter, co-chairman of the legislature's Public Health Committee, supports the bill. He said Friday that if parents are going to "claim...

  • Deal signs order requiring readiness for marijuana law

    ATLANTA (AP) — In an emotional ceremony in his Capitol office, Gov. Nathan Deal signed an executive order Friday ordering state agencies to start preparations now for the enactment of the state's medical marijuana bill. Deal said Friday he'll sign it into law soon after the current legislative session ends April 2 to avoid possible procedural...

  • Medical experts look beyond law to make youth sports safer

    NEW YORK (AP) — To toughen safety standards in youth sports, medical experts are turning away from lawmakers and toward high school sports associations to implement policies and procedures to prevent deaths and serious injuries. The National Athletic Trainers' Association and the American Medical Society for Sports Medicine completed two days...

  • 2nd western Minnesota turkey farm hit by bird flu outbreak

    MINNEAPOLIS (AP) — A second Minnesota turkey farm has been struck by a form of bird flu that's deadly to poultry and will lose 66,000 birds, state and federal officials said Friday. The U.S. Department of Agriculture said the virus hit a flock of 22,000 turkeys at a commercial farm in Lac qui Parle County of western Minnesota. It was the...

  • Co-pilot appeared healthy, but may have hidden illness

    MONTABAUR, Germany (AP) — Germanwings co-pilot Andreas Lubitz appeared happy and healthy to acquaintances, but a picture emerged Friday of a man who hid evidence of an illness from his employers — including a torn-up doctor's note that would have kept him off work the day authorities say he crashed Flight 9525 into an Alpine mountainside. As...

  • South Dakota jury finds hospital not liable for 'KKK' scars

    RAPID CITY, S.D. (AP) — A federal jury has found that a South Dakota hospital is not liable in a case in which a man claimed health care workers carved the letters "KKK" into his stomach during heart surgery in 2011. Jurors ruled in favor of Rapid City Regional Hospital on Friday after five hours of deliberation. The hospital maintained that...

  • White House unveils plan to fight antibiotic-resistant germs

    WASHINGTON (AP) — The White House on Friday announced a five-year plan to fight the threat posed by antibiotic-resistant bacteria amid fears that once-treatable germs could become deadly. Repeated exposure to antibiotics can lead germs to become resistant to the drugs, so that they are no longer effective. The Centers for Disease Control and...

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Heartbeat of Health Care 2015

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