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LETTERS: The best bet to widen I-25; black culture movement

By: Gazette readers
December 7, 2017 Updated: December 7, 2017 at 8:19 am
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We need a level playing field

Why is the I-25 Gap solution a toll lane that we will have to pay for forever? Why can't our elected officials do their jobs and find us the funding? When I read today's top headline story that an unelected new bureaucrat is pushing the idea of toll roads - it comes across as that will be the solution - and he decided it for all of us. I think that the intent is to wear us down and accept this as the only solution to get it done.

I believe that the majority will be opposed to the idea of watching years of construction, and the inconveniences that go with, to only benefit those that have the money to pay to regularly ride in that lane, or those one time 'in a rush' users of it.

We all pay for the roads - in several different tax models now, and the last election permitted some local funds towards it. But we got to vote, and that's what's missing here. I got a survey postcard in the mail and went online to see that they are thinking of charging $6-12 dollars to ride in that lane.

Most of the rest of the state doesn't pay to drive on its roads. Denver always finds money for Denver roads. We need a level playing field here - rich or poor, we all should get to ride on all lanes of the road, after all, we all pay for them.

Kevin Rohan

Colorado Springs

   

No tolls, lower the speed limit

Re: CDOT: Toll lanes best bet to widen I-25.

So, pay to build it and then pay to use it. Tolls to use U.S. 36 express lane can cost almost $7 during peak time. I think I can say regulars will not pay $10 (a guess) round trip per day for the 17 miles, few would increase their commute cost $50 per week. Travel Denver where express lanes exist, and you will not see many vehicles using them.

The answer is to lower the speed limit, along with increased enforcement. Some drivers just do not have the skills to negotiate the 17 miles at 75 mph. Greenland, Larkspur and Tomah have a curve, exits and entrances that are too much for some. (sarcasm)

Added travel times:

75 - 14 min

65 - 16

60 - 17

55 - 19

A little longer but not near as long as sitting 30 minutes for a crash. Also, entering Castle Rock, the road widens from two lanes to three and the speed limit drops to 65 - more lanes, slower speed, explain that. This solution could be implemented quickly, with new signs.

Michael Gerth

Peyton

Another story of double dipping

I am very frustrated by the new approach that the state is taking to raise the money to widen I-25 between Castle Rock and Monument. First they get El Paso County voters to agree to use our tax dollars to help pay for the project. Then they tell us it is going to be a toll road. If they are using taxpayer monies then the road should be free for taxpayers to use. If they want to charge tolls for using that stretch of road then use the tolls collected to pay for building the road. But under no circumstances should they ask taxpayers to pay for the widening of the road and then ask us to pay tolls.

The latest story is to they want to use the tolls collected to maintain the road. Well that is what the tax on gasoline and other fuels is meant for. This is just another story of double dipping by the state! If I could retract my yes vote a month ago I would.

Larry Stanley

Colorado Springs

   

A violation of the Civil Rights Act

Congressman Doug Lamborn is wrong when he said, as he did in a recent Gazette op-ed piece, that a cake decorator has the right to refuse to sell a wedding cake to a gay couple. By so doing this baker is in violation of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, "giving all Americans the right to be served in facilities that are open to the public."

Any merchant who opens his or her doors has a duty to sell to all paying customers, not just those whom he or she likes. Gay people and other customers are taxpayers who pay the salaries of police officers who protect business owners' from crime; of firefighters who protect business owners' property from fire; of health inspectors who let the public know that the business meets health standards; of safety inspectors who let the public know that the business is a safe place to be.

Refusal to sell a wedding cake to a gay couple is no different than refusing to serve a restaurant meal to an African-American, which was the original case that led to the historic 1964 Civil Rights Act. Congressman Lamborn is telling the cake decorator to break the law. As a member of the United States House of Representative he should know better.

David J. Baker

Colorado Springs

   

The black culture movement

Re: Your editorial on the separate but equal CU Boulder dorm.

Although well written and historically correct, you omit the one salient point. Segregation before in the 1960s was at the behest of white people. The decision to offer a segregated dorm at CU was made at the behest of the black people and others who want to live in a cultured environment other than an integrated society.

This is the latest in the movement to have separate graduation ceremonies, acceptable speakers etc.

The black culture movement is manifested by efforts to separate itself from an integrated society. Rather than embracing diversity, the black culture wants separate identities through the new wave of names, hair styles, etc.

Some ask that we accept this as diversity. Another view is the effort to establish a separate culture from the mainstream, integration is not part of the movement.

Bill Robinson

Colorado Springs

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