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LETTERS: Thankful for voters' show of support; more service dogs needed

By: Gazette readers
November 10, 2017 Updated: November 10, 2017 at 6:16 am
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Caption +
Dr. Nicholas Gledich, the superintendent of District 11, left, takes a photo of the countdown screen as Lauren Hugm right countdown from five before the results were to be posted as candidates and others celebrate the passing of 3E on the voting ballot at SoccerHaus on Tuesday November 7, 2017 in Colorado Springs. Voters who approved the 3E ballot measures to significantly increase funding for K-12 schools in the D-11 schools. (Photo by Dougal Brownlie, The Gazette).

Thankful for voters' show of support

On behalf of the Colorado Springs School District 11 Board of Education, staff, and myself, I would like to take a moment to thank the D-11 voters for passing the mill levy override. The MLO passed by a 57 percent vote, and we are deeply grateful to our voters for making this critical funding a reality for our center city school district. The passage of the mill levy override will help D-11 attract and retain quality teachers and support staff, provide much needed building and infrastructure repairs and updates, give students access to today's technology, and help to create a safer learning environment.

Your support is valuable beyond words, and that is whyD-11 is one of only three large school districts in Colorado that has a citizens' oversight committee to monitor all MLO funds for accounting accuracy and program benefit. We invite you to be a part of the oversight committee by emailing your contact information and interest to Doris.Hensley@d11.org .

Again we thank the D-11 voters for your support. Our schools, district, students, and community will benefit from your support!

Dr. Nicholas Gledich, Superintendent District 11

Colorado Springs

   

Treating horrendous illnesses with CBD

I understand the concerns surrounding the legalization of marijuana, yet I am not here to talk about why marijuana should be legal, but why cannabidiol commonly known as CBD should be. CBD is one of over 80 chemical compounds found in the cannabis plant and while THC is the principal mind-altering component of cannabis, CBD stands out because it does not have the psychedelic effects that THC does, and it displays a broad range of potential health benefits.

Many studies have found that CBD was effective in reducing the frequency and severity of seizures in both children and adults. CBD has even been proven to help fight cancer, and research shows that CBD benefits include being effective in fighting breast cancer cells. Data also suggests that it can be used to stop the invasion of lung and colon cancer, plus it possesses anti-tumor properties and has even been used to treat leukemia.

CBD is still illegal in 14 states, and many families have been forced to move to states where it is legal to help their children. Parents who are caught giving CBD to their kids in a state where it is illegal, can face jail time and even lose their children. If a plant can help treat horrific illnesses, then why do we object?

Thea Titus

Colorado Springs

   

Crime not a mental health problem

I want to scream this from the top of the First Bank Building with the biggest amplifiers and loudspeakers on Earth: Crime is not a mental health problem! Violent crime, as a social phenomenon, is not related to mental illness.

Scientific study of mass media show that they, including news outlets, misrepresent the nature of mental illness, greatly exaggerating the public danger. Mental health experts have found that people with mental illness have substantially lower serious crime rates overall, than do others without such diagnoses.

Colorado's preposterously complex system of universal background checks for gun transfers, which supposedly reaches down to control garage sales and buddies trading guns, failed to catch the alleged perpetrator of the First Baptist murders. Mental health providers are required by law and professional ethics to report credible dangers. Impact of such laws: Apparently zero.

One thing very closely associated with violence is the offenders' experience of domestic abuse while growing up. Around 95 percent of those incarcerated for violent offenses exhibit clear evidence of serious physical abuse dating from childhood: scars, burn marks, untreated bone fractures - and extreme rage and violence. Background checks and gun control won't find those symptoms. The criminal justice system cannot deal with those kinds of problems.

The "debate" about gun control and mental health and crime are all being made in a vacuum maintained by ignorance and prejudice.

Eldon Dickens

Colorado Springs

   

Why aren't there more service dogs?

I read an article in The Gazette that was titled "Cañon City's 'Miracle Dog' warns owner of gas leak". I found this article to be quite touching but it made me think, why are more dogs not trained as service dogs or even emotional support dogs.

I work in a restaurant where I often see service dogs pass throughout the days and I often wonder what their specific purpose is. However, it also makes me wonder what if people more frequently had emotional support dogs?

I've heard that putting your dog through service training can be tedious and expensive, but what if it wasn't? Most dogs live happiest when given a purpose and if we were to train dogs to be emotional support animals as if it were normal and a standard protocol like vaccinations for them then it could change things about the world. It could deplete the pharmaceutical market for certain types of mood stabilizers and drugs of that nature.

Isabella Monastersky

Colorado Springs

   

Community college bridges the gap

The community college is the backbone of the adult education system. Not only does it provide a quality education at an affordable price and offers smaller classrooms for a more personal experience, it also affords opportunities for higher education that might be otherwise unavailable to some members of the community. In comparison to a community college, a state university costs significantly more money, is likely much farther away from your family, and almost certainly has a much larger campus which may be very intimidating. Someone trying to ease into the college experience might not be ready for any or all of this, especially if they're a first-generation college student. A community college, on the other hand, bridges the gap between high school and higher education for those whose circumstances or disposition make a state university an unappealing choice. Speaking from my personal experience, as someone that struggled with school and lacked motivation and enthusiasm, my community college experience has provided a pleasant experience in which I can thrive.

Robert Oblisk

Colorado Springs

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