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LETTERS: Olympic sex abuse exhibit?; Ask if we are citizens; and more

By: The Gazette letters
March 10, 2018 Updated: March 10, 2018 at 10:46 am
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Good education legislation

Rep. Jim Banks of Indiana intends to introduce the Military Education Savings Account Act of 2018, and Rep. Doug Lamborn of Colorado Springs has already signed on as a co-sponsor.

Veterans receive GI bill funds that enable them to attend a college of their choice. This proposal allows military parents to similarly use voluntary Education Savings Accounts, with tax funds allocated to education, to send their children to schools or education options of their choosing. The Military Education Savings Account Act of 2018 is a fine step in an extremely simple, solidly ethical, and sensibly responsible direction: Taxes are collected to educate the children of America. Why not permit American citizens to direct those tax revenues as wisely and critically as they would the money in their wallets? Let people seek out and find the best value for their dollar. This is a wonderful alternative to the usual solution, where government decides the program, pays for it, you get what you get, and if it isn't quite what you want, the government pays even more for it. Let's begin this important reform on behalf of veterans and not stop there.

As a money-saving benefit, this added freedom will only increase satisfaction for parents in the military. The intensive training these people receive to defend our nation will not turn over due to parents not having satisfactory education options for their children.

It is good to see legislators making sound and ethical decisions and defending one nation, under God, with liberty and justice for all!

William Bell

Colorado Springs

   

A sex abuse exhibit?

One question is how the issue of sexual abuse will be addressed in the new Olympic Museum. Will there be a section devoted to the issue of sexual abuse by coaches, trainers, doctors?

I expect the museum will give voice to these issues and neither ignore, nor cherry pick its exhibits. This is a reality that cannot be tossed aside. While the movie "Chariots of Fire" provided inspiration, the movie "I Tonya" provides contrast to the early days of the Olympics.

The early days of the modern Olympic movement were an inspiration to sportsmanship, fair play, and international cooperation much as the ancient Olympics were. Where have we come since then? The ancient Olympics allowed individual participation only. Countries did not enter teams, nationalism was not encouraged. The Olympic Museum should emphasize the original vision of the ancient Olympics and the hope of the early modern Olympics verses the modern Olympics. No one who has studied the issue can say they are the same.

I doubt the spirit of the ancient Olympics or early days of the modern Olympics have anything to do with North and South Korea talking. But we can hope.

Marshall Griffith

Colorado Springs

   

Tariffs a bad idea

In case you haven't read them, I would urge you to read (or reread) the Lawrence Kudlow opinion piece on Wednesday's Gazette's op/ed page as well as The Washington Examiner piece on the Opinion page.

The U.S. has a history of economically disastrous results from steel tariffs. The present case will be no exception. The steel jobs that existed in Youngstown, Ohio, 60 years ago when my cousin worked there are never coming back. At that time, we could no longer compete with our embedded obsolete technology.

Later, the new technology and automation that made the production processes and labor of that era obsolete forever ushered in a new, more competitive and more profitable, though smaller, steel industry in the U.S. It may be time for another reinvestment in modern processes as well as the human capital required to operate these more sophisticated processes.

Why threaten millions of high-paying factory jobs in high value-added steel-using industries to prolong a large handful of jobs in basic steel and aluminum? Other than to make good on a campaign promise, you will have to ask the president about that one. Even the Defense Department does not consider the U.S. steel industry to be a necessary strategic asset.

Will the tariffs cause us to import more manufactured finished products now that these imports have a competitive advantage over ours produced with more expensive steel due to the tariffs? Will we then have to slap tariffs on these manufactured items further threatening retaliatory tariffs on aircraft, agriculture and other exports where we now have good markets?

I, too, worked in a factory 60 years ago after graduating from high school. If you look at that same factory now, the processes and machinery are entirely different, much more automated and the labor much more productive. This has allowed for better pay and less expensive products, improving the lot of us all. The future is not in bringing back the factories of the 1950s. The future is in applying American innovation, technology, capital financing and trained skilled labor to better competing in producing the high-valued products the world demands. Tariffs will only be counterproductive to this future.

Ivan James

Colorado Springs

   

Ask if we are citizens

I strongly agree with the Department of Justice that a citizenship question must be part of the 2020 Census. Democrats strongly disagree because redistricting is based upon headcount, and they don't want illegal aliens shying away from census participation. Since illegal aliens are not citizens by definition, why would any logical person want them counted for congressional representation? They don't vote, do they (except possibly in California, New York and Florida)?

The Centers for Disease Control wants everyone counted for their disease and consequent public health planning. Their position is that if illegal aliens are encouraged not to participate due to enforcement concerns, CDC planning will not include the "shadow population" (my term). I say, since all illegal aliens are subject to deportation, why would we want potentially excessive health care assets allocated for that population? Let's get to the bottom line; citizens are here legally as are people on valid visas. Basically, everyone else is here illegally; please help me understand why I am paying my tax dollars for illegals who should be deported? I guess if my dissatisfaction grows much deeper, I can always move to Mexico and get on its welfare system. Also, maybe I can help build the wall from the southern side!

Russell Sanderson

Colorado Springs

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