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LETTERS: Mayor John Suthers says 'we can't handle the truth'

By: Gazette readers
January 7, 2018 Updated: January 8, 2018 at 1:17 pm
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Colorado Springs Mayor John Suthers June 6, 2015. Photo by Mark Reis, The Gazette

Recent letters to the editor from Gazette readers.

Mayor: 'We can't handle the truth'

It is apparent that even members of Congress are in need of a remedial course on the basic principles of American government.

As a lawyer and public office holder, I have observed that a not insignificant number of Americans have misunderstandings about the proper role of the respective branches of our government in the enactment and enforcement of the law. But after watching the reaction to the memo sent by U.S. Attorney General Sessions to federal prosecutors regarding the enforcement of marijuana laws, I'm now convinced that this civics deficit has pervaded the highest levels of our government, including Congress.

Attorney General Sessions sent a memo to federal prosecutors saying it was not appropriate for prior administers of the executive branch to dictate, as a matter of policy, that federal prosecutors, as members of the executive branch, refrain from prosecuting laws passed by Congress pertaining to marijuana. Instead federal prosecutors should treat marijuana laws passed by Congress the same as other laws passed by Congress, and exercise their discretion based on available resources, likelihood of conviction, etc.

For reiterating this basic principle of American government that it's the role of Congress to enact laws and the role of the executive branch to enforce them, Sessions should have been applauded by civics-savvy Americans. Instead, his testament to the rule of law was greeted by much outrage, including by members of Congress. Colorado's two U. S. senators, both lawyers, were among the outraged. How dare the chief law enforcement officer of the country suggest it was not appropriate for the Obama administration to direct the executive branch to ignore laws passed by us as members of Congress. How dare the attorney general acknowledge that if Congress doesn't like the laws they passed, it's Congress and not the executive branch that has the responsibility to change them.

But of course an effort to change laws involves hard work and political risk, and might not succeed. So it's much more politically expedient to criticize the attorney general for reminding us that it's an essential tenet of the rule of law that Congress enacts laws and the executive branch, including the Department of Justice, enforces them.

When it comes to basic civics, maybe we can't handle the truth.

Mayor John Suthers

Colorado Springs

    

Implications of legal abortions

Jan. 22 marks yet another anniversary of the Roe-Wade decision on abortion. Pro-life groups differ on the number of infants killed every day in America. Estimates vary from 2,800 to 4,000. Whichever number applies, it involves a lot of children.

Abortion providers excuse their practice by citing rare cases of rape, incest, or possible deformities, but they fail to mention their hefty profits from fees and the sale of body parts. They claim to offer women's health services, but ignore both physical health and mental problems that may result in their patients. Some women even die from "legal" abortions.

Innocent babies are often mentioned as unwanted. Yet many loving couples long for a child regardless of circumstances.

Abortion is an extremely painful death for an unborn child, either burned by saline or cut to pieces, scraped out and discarded.

There was once a man, Rubert Merick, born with terrible deformities. He was rejected and ridiculed and known as "the Elephant Man" until someone took time to know him and discover a wonderful human. In Merick's words, his response was "my life is full because I am loved."

Hitler decided to judge who he felt was worthy to live. Are Americans any better? Ask your legislators if they are pro-life. If not, it's time to rid them goodbye by ballot.

Edmund Burke said, "The only thing necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing". This is my attempt to do something. Americans of conscience should do everything morally possible to end the carnage. And pray for healing for those who chose abortion to solve a temporary problem.

Margaret Henkens

Colorado Springs

    

Start the negotiations now

The recent kerfuffle over Attorney General Jeff Session's statements concerning marijuana seems to be the opening salvo for negotiations and compromise. I believe pro-marijuana states can reason and negotiate with the federal government and our elected officials to come to a compromise over this.

Please consider this, our Congress can pass legislation that our president may sign into law, allowing states to self-determine pot laws if perhaps states would repeal sanctuary status for states and cities, cooperate with federal authorities over illegal immigration enforcement to protect Americans.

President Donald Trump is the king of negotiations. Let's start the discussions now. DACA for the "Wall". Some oil exploration and development for some areas of preservation. We are all in this together, let's act like it. Everyone can enjoy a piece of the "happy meal" if we just work together.

Mark Rozman

Colorado Springs

     

Mitigating the homeless situation

Re: Gazette article "Help the homeless."

I will volunteer to provide transportation to tour and view the abundant "help wanted signs" displayed by a multitude of local businesses.

I will help pass out flyers that reveal California has legalized marijuana. It is much warmer, and they are geared up to provide free food, shelter, and other services to homeless and illegals that vote for Democrats.

Somethings that might mitigate the situation is to pass an ordinance that requires a 300-foot distance from any waterway for the following activities: camping, storing trash, and depositing human waste into streams that provide municipal water to hundreds of towns and cities from here to the Gulf of Mexico.

Some states now have laws that prohibit government assistance to anyone addicted to drugs or alcohol.

Max Tallent

Colorado Springs

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