Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

LETTERS: Let the consumers decide; statistics don't support Sessions' decision

By: Gazette readers
January 8, 2018 Updated: January 8, 2018 at 4:05 am
0
Caption +
In this photo taken May 26, 2011, show a Nissan Leaf charging in Portland, Ore. A series of fast-charging stations for electric cars will be installed this year along Interstate 5 in Southern Oregon to become one of the first links in a Green Highway stretching down the West Coast from Canada to Mexico. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer)

Let the consumers decide

Kudos to H. Wayne Hall for pointing out the significant infrastructure costs of an all electric vehicle economy. He points out that banning diesel and gas vehicles will require us to increase our electric production by nearly 50 percent. There are over 8,000 power plants in the U. S.

That means we will have to build about 4,000 plants or an equivalent number of renewable sources at enormous costs. And, that kind of infrastructure project does not happen overnight or in 10 or even 20 years.

In addition to the capital expense of building power sources, there are significant other infrastructure effects. Every existing gas station will have to dig up their underground tanks and most will go out of business.

While most recharging of electric vehicles will occur at home, overnight, if owners want to go very far from home, they will need charge stations. It takes over 30 minutes to charge an electric car. It only takes about five minutes to fill a car with gas. So, filling stations are going to look like drive in theaters with lots of cars hooked up to power cords.

How are federal and state roads going to be funded without gasoline taxes?

Some suggest that every vehicle have a meter installed that would transmit yearly mileage to the government. Or, maybe we could tax the charging stations. But, how would we tax home chargers?

Another consideration is how would we charge vehicles if one of our enemies attacks us with an electromagnetic pulse weapon or a cyber attack, which takes our electric grid out? Electric vehicles would get about 300 miles after such an attack and then would be useless unless you have access to a gas or diesel generator.

Electric vehicle economy might be in our future, but it's not going to happen tomorrow and it's not going to be cheap. Why don't we let the consumers decide and keep the government out of it?

Rip Blaisdell

Teller County

Most lives will not be impacted

For all the emotionally fragile marijuana advocates who are reacting with alarm at the U.S. attorney general's announcement Thursday, regarding federal enforcement of existing drug laws (i.e., the Cole/Ogden Memo is rescinded) and are planning to hurl themselves in front of a city bus in despair, I have a suggestion; in the immortal words of Sgt. Hulka in the movie "Stripes":

"Lighten up, Frances."

In review (for the uninitiated): The attorney general (the chief law enforcement officer of the United States, by the way) is sworn to uphold the laws of the United States of America. It's his job. The current truth is that marijuana cultivation, sales, possession and distribution are federal crimes.

I'm somewhat confident that your lives will not be impacted by the attorney general's announcement that the Department of Justice is committed to the enforcement of federal laws, and will likely not step over into the "States Rights" arena...unless some of the users of this drug (who only use it because, "it's the only thing that helps my arthritis") decide to become entrepreneurs, and cross state lines to sell this drug in states that aren't as enlightened as all of the fine Americans in Colorado, California, etc.

Have some cheese with your whine.

Grow up.

John Erskine

Colorado Springs

Statistics don't support decision

Attorney General Jeff Sessions sent a memo on Thursday, rescinding the Cole memo, the memo which directed the Drug Administration to turn its focus away from marijuana operations which were legal in various states. This is not the first time Sessions has been vocal about marijuana law, and in May he detailed his worries in a letter to Congress in which he says, "I believe it would be unwise for Congress to restrict the discretion of the Department to fund particular prosecutions, particularly in the midst of an historic drug epidemic and potentially long-term uptick in violent crime." His comment regarding a "potentially long-term uptick in violent crime" is profoundly unsubstantiated, and statistics from Colorado's Department of Public Safety web page show an increase in crime in Colorado from 2011 (just before legalization) to 2015 of less than 1 percent, and a national decrease in crime of less than 1 percent during the same period. In other words, violent crime both nationally and in Colorado has remained nearly static during the period of legalization. Additionally, Sessions' concerns about "an historic drug epidemic" are equally unfounded, since it is true that the United States is undergoing an epidemic of opioid use, however. The National Survey on Drug Use and Health shows a decrease in teen marijuana use after legalization of about 12 percent, year-over-year, from 2013 to 2015.

Comparing crime and health statistics with Sessions' justification for rolling back on legalization measures leads to the conclusion that he is either deeply misinformed or unscrupulously politically motivated.

Cierra Childs

Colorado Springs

Blighted neighborhood in southeast

Recently, The Gazette ran an article on the southeast. If you want to see the southeast go to the Wildflower area, for example. You will see why this area is as the article states - people do not care about anything. You have homes with five or more cars parked around the home, some with 10 or more. Cars that do not run as no motors, etc., 5th wheels, trailer homes sitting in driveways, with people living in them for weeks or more. Cars are on lawns, backyards, side of the houses. Garbage and junk are all over yards. Eighteen-wheelers are parked on the street - Irving Drive for example - which block the view of oncoming cars.

Once again the law does not care and people do not care. It is sad and if you go to the north end of town you do not see any of this. This is just one neighborhood but there are more just like it. The article made a lot of sense.

Bob Taylor

Colorado Springs

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

or
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 
This is your last FREE article for the month
This is your last FREE article for the month

Subscribe now and enjoy Unlimited Digital Access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
You have reached your article limit for the month
You have reached your article limit for the month

We hope that you've enjoyed your complimentary access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.