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LETTERS: Lagging faith in people restored; problems enforcing the rules

By: Letters
October 26, 2016 Updated: October 26, 2016 at 4:25 am
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photo - Steve Beaumont leads his father, Richard Beaumont up a hill on the Pikes Peak Greenway trail Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. They are visiting the area from England, their two week stay ends tomorrow. They said they have enjoyed the scenery of the area.
CAROL LAWRENCE, The GAZETTE
Steve Beaumont leads his father, Richard Beaumont up a hill on the Pikes Peak Greenway trail Thursday, Oct. 13, 2016. They are visiting the area from England, their two week stay ends tomorrow. They said they have enjoyed the scenery of the area. CAROL LAWRENCE, The GAZETTE 

Lagging faith in people restored

Just when you start to think the whole world is crazy, and that everyone is partisan and self-centered, along comes someone who makes you realize that's just not true. On Saturday, I was enjoying a bicycle ride with my friend Jennifer along the Greenway Trail near the Gossage complex, when I was involved in a crash that slammed me head first into the concrete. There were two other riders nearby who assisted me and offered to provide transportation to wherever I needed to go, and even to make field repairs to my bike. Unfortunately, I didn't get these gentlemen's names.

I declined their generous offers and decided to walk the nearly 5 miles back to where we were parked, despite the heat and the fact that I was bleeding from a couple of lacerations on my face. After a few minutes, a pair of riders approached and stopped by us, noticing me clutching tissues to my face and drops of red on my shirt. They also offered to drive us to wherever we needed to go, but again I declined. In about two minutes, just as I was realizing the folly of my plan, these two wonderful people returned, and firmly but politely said they would drive us to help. Curt (or Kurt?) and his gracious wife Stacy went way out of their way to load our bikes and us into their car, which required them to leave their own bikes along the trail. Curt is a doctor and fortunately recognized that I wasn't thinking clearly at the time. They drove us to our vehicles, looked at my wounds, recommended that I seek medical attention, and did everything possible to be helpful. I was very fortunate to encounter these two on Saturday.

It has restored my sometimes lagging faith in people to know that there are, in fact, folks around who think of others before themselves. Thank you, Stacy and Curt. Hopefully I can pay it forward with the same compassion for a stranger in need.

Mark Robbins

Colorado Springs

Lamborn and his good neighbors

The Gazette recently quoted U.S. Rep. Doug Lamborn as saying, "The Air Force is going above and beyond in their willingness to be a good . neighbor" in regards to the contamination of the groundwater in the Security, Widefield and Fountain. "The money and time they are investing will go a long way toward addressing the needs of the citizens of our region." According to the same article, studies going back to the late 1970s have shown the perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) to be carcinogenic, harmful to the environment and cause health problems. Yet the Air Force continues to use the chemical in Colorado Springs and just last week accidentally released 150,000 gallons of polluted water into the sewage system and thereby into Fountain Creek.

People in the contaminated areas have bathed, drank, cooked and watered their gardens for decades with water contaminated by PFCs, which don't just go away like evaporated water. They stay in the body for many years.

Lamborn's comments about "good neighbors" shows that he continues to pander to the military and conservative vote despite the health concerns of tens of thousands of people in his district affected by contaminated water. If you're a neighbor of Lamborn, watch out. His idea of a good neighbor is quite twisted.

Landon Finch

Security

Promoting conservative ideas

I would like to respond to Dave Routhier's letter about lack of choice. He says that the Republicans blocked everything to embarrass President Barack Obama and suggests that is the reason to vote Democrat. Has he forgotten or conveniently ignored how many bills Harry Reid and Nancy Pelosi blocked when the Democrats controlled Congress and George Bush was president (of course the media did not label them as obstructionists).

The majority of the voters in that cycle elected Republicans for conservative ideas over the Democrats' liberal ideas. When the Republicans blocked bills, they were doing what they were elected to do - that is, promote some conservative ideas. Of course, President Obama is on record as saying that conservative ideas are so wrong that we (the Democrats) will not even bother to acknowledge them. But it seems as though when the liberals don't get their way, they call names and threaten to run to their safe place.

Tom Keilers

Colorado Springs

The difference between walls

I have never seen such a distorted view of the history of the Berlin Wall as when I read the letter from Hermine Wise. The Berlin Wall was erected to hold people into a Soviet system of forced poverty and lack of freedom. People could not get out into freedom and when the wall fell, the populace ran. The West kept Berlin open and West Berlin became the place people escaped to. Defectors ran from the Soviet system of enforced poverty for years, finding many ingenious methods and places of escape.

The country that loses control of its borders ceases to be a country. Wise does not seem to understand that this country is getting millions of illegal entries flooding our country's social, labor, welfare, educational, prison (not all are just hardworking folks) and medical systems on a regular basis. We, the people, pay into these systems through our tax money. We need to stop the influx of thousands of people we can't account for. Temporary work visas are one thing. Unlimited rivers of humanity arriving are a strain on us.

There is a difference between a wall to keep people confined and a wall to stem the tide of people rushing in to strain our country and its systems.

Donna T. Hartley

Black Forest

Problems enforcing the leash rules

I was hiking in the Palmer Open Space recently. Before I went hiking I had heard some folks comment on dogs not being on a leash in that area. In fact, one person said that he was menaced by a dog recently on the Palmer trails. I read the rules before going up the trail and noticed that dogs were to be kept on a leash. I decided to mention the leash law to two folks who were approaching me on the trail with a dog unleashed. I said "Perhaps you are not aware that dogs are supposed to be on leash on these trails". Their comment to me was, "Perhaps you should keep your mouth shut." Well, there you go, some folks just always have an answer. Now I understand part of the problem with trying to enforce this rule. Maybe I should wait until I am menaced before saying anything, or maybe not.

Zene Gurley

Colorado Springs

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