Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

Gazette Premium Content LETTERS: In confidence means just that; 'happy' golf course

Letters Published: April 26, 2014

In confidence means just that

I beg to differ with the op-ed presented by Bentley Rayburn on Sunday, April 20. The Air Force Academy comes under the auspices of the United States government where there is an understanding that there is a separation of church and state. He stated that airmen should confidentially practice their beliefs while respecting others whose viewpoints differ from their own.

To me in confidence means just that - not advertising your feelings openly.

I think that ideas and issues should be discussed but when it comes to those issues with religious overtones, they should be in a religious facility led by a minister, priest, rabbi or mullah.

Rosalie Roslin, Colorado Springs

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Stop religious self-indulgence

The Air Force Academy is not a social club or a church group, It is presumably a military academy.

It seeks to train young people the whys and hows on how to follow and how to lead. It is designed to build trust and confidence between followers and leaders.

Do you really not understand that followers won't trust any leader who insists that their religious view is the only worthy view, and if you don't believe that leader's view he/she won't protect or promote you? (That in real life now already happens in the Air Force.)

Proselytizers are not trustworthy! Proselytizers are unreliable as either leaders or followers. In military duty especially, trust is paramount! Unreliability in military operations is the great sin. Self-serving attitudes and behaviors are ultimately destructive for good military duty. Distrust weakens a military mind-set and therefore weakens military competence and capacity.

Doug Lamborn and others, do you really want to encourage distrust, unreliability, self-serving attitudes, destructive behaviors, a weakened military and social unworthiness? Stop publicly encouraging religious self-indulgence. Personal belief is just that, personal! Can you honor that? Please?

Dean E. Tollefson, Colorado Springs

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The government is us

Cliven Bundy, despite what the tea party and right-wing armed protesters say, is a deadbeat, not a hero. By not paying grazing fees to the Bureau of Land Management for his cattle to exist on federal land, Bundy's situation is the same as a tenant who refuses to pay rent to a landlord.

Sen. Harry Reid is correct in calling the cowards who put their children in harm's way "domestic terrorists." Since Bundy has not paid federal grazing fees for 20 years and owes a million dollars to the government, the BLM is justified in seizing his cattle. All those protesters should have been arrested, along with Bundy, for interfering with government agents in the performance of their duties.

The government is us. It is taxpayers - you and I - who have been cheated by Bundy's refusal to pay. Direct your anger at Bundy, not the federal government.

David J. Baker, Colorado Springs

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Questioning legislation's faulty logic

I read that a bill had been passed that would forbid placing inmates in solitary confinement if they have a serious mental illness. My question is - what are they doing in prison if they have a serious mental illness? Do we not have institutions for these people where they could get treatment?

Shirley Fair, Colorado Springs

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Golf course where everyone's happy

The article, "Private pot club gets council's OK", evoked an epiphany for me.

Sheelah and I moved to our dream home on Oct. 1, 1991. Gorgeous views, lovely weather, close to the world's best skiing, wonderful neighbors, no mosquitoes and right on Gleneagle golf course.

A dream come true.

It still is a dream home except the golf course closed last November. I don't blame the owner because the revenue wasn't sufficient to support the course operation, let alone make a profit.

After reading the above article, I have arrived at a solution which should make everyone happy:

Reopen the complex as a combination social, golf and pot club.

Plow up the roughs and plant pot. This should grow a plentiful, ongoing supply of product. Leave the fairways for golfers. Whenever a golfer hit his ball into the rough, he'd become just a bit happier and by the time he arrived at the second nine, only the very best golfers would be concerned with their scores and they should be happy anyway. We'd get our golf course back, and the owner would make enough money to retire.

The existing beautiful new clubhouse has three levels. The bottom (smallest one) could serve as a medical marijuana facility. The ground floor could serve as a public recreational area and retail outlet with inside and outside consumption facilities. The outside decks would serve as prime viewing spots where the breezes would waft smoke to the neighbor's houses in sufficient quantities that even we older nonconsumers would be happy and contented most of the time.

The top floor could serve as a private club for the better heeled, serious pot smokers. The pro shop could double as a candy and cookies shop and, of course, the adjacent kitchen and dining rooms could offer haute cuisine featuring the Springs's most enjoyable desserts.

Everyone's happy. We keep our golf course. We have a new tourist attraction. The resulting tax revenue would be a bonanza for the Pikes Peak area and, who knows, we might even try some product ourselves. I did once 40 years ago, but I didn't inhale.

Bill Lund, Colorado Springs

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