Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

LETTERS: Homeless won't spend on housing; reasons for a 'red flag' law

By: Gazette readers
May 14, 2018 Updated: May 14, 2018 at 4:11 am
0
Caption +
Kristen Bailey with Rocky Mountain Human Services, left, and Colorado Springs Police Homeless Outreach Team officer Tim Kippel walk past a homeless campsite south of downtown Colorado Springs Monday, January 23, 2017 while conducting the annual Point in Time survey of the homeless. Photo by Mark Reis, The Gazette

Homeless won't spend on housing

I fail to understand how "affordable housing" is going to impact the "homeless" camping, urinating and defecating in public places. They are where they are because of untreated mental illness and/or addiction to drugs and alcohol.

The underlying assumption of the "advocates'" calling for shelter and housing is that these people just don't have enough money to pay rent. In truth, their incomes are from occasional government assistance and begging on street corners, plus the usual petty crimes. They don't labor for paychecks. They seem to have enough money for cigarettes, booze and drugs, and of course they eat free here in the Springs. They just aren't spending their money on housing.

A society that refuses to care for those unable to care for themselves is truly sick. Public flophouses aren't going to solve the problem. Yet until such time as the legal system involuntarily commits the mentally ill and addicted to hospitals for treatment, I suspect we will just have to live with the filthy, crazy addicts committing slow suicide in plain sight.

Stephen Coonts

Colorado Springs

Reasons for a 'red flag' law

As a Republican and a gun owner and enthusiast, I am disappointed that our elected officials, specifically Republicans in the Senate, cannot come together and craft a common-sense gun "red flag" law. It would allow family members or certain law enforcement to go before a court and in sworn testimony warn that a family member has exhibited significant behavior - potentially violent, emotionally unhinged, or psychologically challenged - that would pose a risk to themselves or others.

Due process would come in the form of a hearing and the gun owner would have subsequent opportunities to show recovery. It is generally a crime now to falsely report, which would provide a safeguard against vindictive actions.

When one buys a gun and goes through the background check, two of the questions are whether the applicant is a felon or is suffering from a psychological disorder. Under current gun laws, a gun owner who is convicted of a felony must dispose of his weapons. Why then, if a gun owner develops a severe psychological disorder, should there not be the same result?

We can all agree in the aftermath of several recent shooting incidents, that upon consideration, the shooter never should have had a gun.

Finally, Vicki Marble's comment that if the law allows for the taking of guns, it should also allow for removal of other dangerous implements, such as shovels. Don't do that, as there would be nothing left to deal with the BS.

Kent Karber

Colorado Springs

Danger in the House farm bill

I find it unbelievable that the House farm bill contains an extremely damaging provision, the "Poisoned Pollinators Provision," which would exempt the EPA from key requirements that protect imperiled species under the Endangered Species Act. This provision states that the EPA would no longer be required to assess the harm a pesticide might do to an endangered species before it could be approved.

Pollinators are absolutely vital to our way of life. One-third of our food is pollinated by birds, bees, bats, and other insects, and farmers depend upon pollinators for food production. The House farm bill is supposed to support farmers, help feed America, and fund important conservation programs that protect wildlife and our farm lands. Instead, this bill is being used as a vehicle to pass an attack on the Endangered Species Act that would harm important pollinators.

According to Colorado Department of Agriculture, our state is home to thousands of species of pollinators, including 946 species of native bees, 250 species of butterflies, and 11 species of migrating hummingbirds.

But it's not just pollinators that are negatively affected by pesticide use. Native Colorado species like the black-footed ferret and the bald eagle were driven to near extinction by pesticides.

In spite of these facts, the House farm bill would make it legal to kill an endangered species with a pesticide. This is unacceptable.

The House farm bill is expected to be on the floor very soon. Our Colorado representatives need to stand up and do what is right and must oppose this bill.

Pamela Van Scotter

Colorado Springs

Ways to make a difference

I have been reading a publication of David Cook Ministries, and I came upon an article by Beth Lueders.

For me, it answered the ever recurring question, "What can one person do to reduce hostility, even hatred, between our young people and our peace officers?" The sad death of one of our very own, a third-generation peace officer, leaving his wife and two small children, brought the question into sharp focus.

Every single day we hear newscasts of the shootings of at least one police officer as well as that of the shooter. The statistics of divorce and suicide among law enforcement personnel are higher than of any other profession. You might just not hear about it.

It has been my experience that when a young child develops a friendship with a policeman or other officer, the bond remains in his life as long as he lives. The "cop" I knew as a child attended my high school graduation.

"Adopt A Cop" can make inroads on the carnage going on every day in America. You can begin being a part of it by going on the internet. Visit adopt-a-cop.org and let's get this going to protect young people as well as our peace officers.

Check out the Adopt-a-cop prayer coin. This movement it gaining momentum and it is a positive, good thing, whether in small towns or big cities. Whole families can do it, too.

Teachers, how about having your class write a letter of appreciation to officers of your city as a writing or English assignment? Pastors, youth directors, would it be inappropriate to suggest individuals and classes pray for our troops and first responders, our fire personnel, our school security guards and write to them?

Evelyn French

Colorado Springs

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

or
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 
This is your last FREE article for the month
This is your last FREE article for the month

Subscribe now and enjoy Unlimited Digital Access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
You have reached your article limit for the month
You have reached your article limit for the month

We hope that you've enjoyed your complimentary access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 

Exclusive Subscriber Content

You read The Gazette because you care about your community and the local stories you can't find anywhere else.

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber? Get Access | Already a digital subscriber? Log In
 
articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.