Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

LETTERS: Football game not the appropriate forum

By: Gazette readers
May 31, 2018 Updated: May 31, 2018 at 6:31 am
0
Caption +
San Francisco 49ers quarterback Colin Kaepernick (7) and San Francisco 49ers outside linebacker Eli Harold (58) kneel during the playing of the National anthem before the first half of an NFL football game between the Atlanta Falcons and the San Francisco 49ers, Sunday, Dec. 18, 2016, in Atlanta. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

Not the appropriate forum

I was appalled to read Cordelia Hecker's recent letter ("Forcing players to stand", Gazette Your Viewpoint, May 27) which likened requiring NFL players to stand for the national anthem to wearing KKK ads on their uniforms. This assertion is as ridiculous as saying placing your hand over your heart during the anthem is akin to the "Heil Hitler" salute of the Nazi regime.

Is asking a person to show respect for our country really the same as requiring them to promote white supremacy? There is nothing nefarious about standing for the national anthem, which represents a sign of respect for the country, its founders and its protectors. In fact, some countries require citizens to stand for their anthem. However, in the U.S., NFL players who do not feel it is patriotic to stand for our anthem may opt out by remaining in the locker room during its playing.

Hecker goes on to say that "A company should not hold forced protests, so either let the players do as they wish or stop playing the anthem." Hmmm. with that logic, I guess it would be fine if a player held up their middle finger during the playing of the anthem. I'm all for freedom of speech, but just like yelling "fire" in a crowded movie theater is inappropriate if there is no fire, I believe that the playing of the National Anthem is not the appropriate forum to stage a protest.

David White

Colorado Springs

   

Logo issue was a lesson

The title of David Ramsey's May 28 article "Suit flub teaches very real lesson," is right on and perhaps "lesson" should have been plural as there are multiple lessons in this incident.

What Ramsey failed to mention is the logo issue was known in advance. Coaches were told to bring any swimmer who may have an illegal suit to a coaches' meeting before the meet. In the referee world that is known as preventive officiating. Four swimmers from other schools attended and were told to change their suits before the meet. None of those swimmers were from Discovery Canyon.

Ramsey can look at the rule and any other as "meaningless," "silly," and "a trifling technicality" (his words), but the real story is here is a coaching failure. We can excuse the swimmer for not knowing the logo restriction, but not the coach. Although the size of a logo yields no competitive advantage, logos are regulated in every NFHS and NCAA sport - no exceptions. Coaches must know the rules their team competes under and they are expected to teach them.

Ramsey states outright he wishes the "aggressively vigilant" CHSAA would have found a way to overlook the rule. That would set a fine example "don't worry about the rules, if we don't like it, we'll ignore it." Would have that been fair to the other teams?

Actually, the best way to get a seemingly flawed rule or penalty changed is to enforce it!

George Demetriou

Colorado Springs

   

A dysfunctional leader

Donald Trump's Memorial Day comments about himself and his "accomplishments" was disgusting. He dodged and avoided military service.

Trump's narcissistic view of himself as the center of the universe is embarrassing for any American who cares about democracy - especially on Memorial Day.

Trump is a dysfunctional leader, and a terrible role model.

Blessings to the families of the true American heroes who gave their lives to defend our democracy. It is up to us who are fortunate to live in the USA to make sure we don't let Trump and other self-centered "leaders" undermine our great country.

Doug Landolfi

Colorado Springs

   

Placing the blame for violence

After reading Jac Roberson's Letter to the Editor on May 25, I can't help but respond.

Certainly, one has to agree with Roberson that saving lives should be everyone's concern. However, given all the evil, or call it ill-will, in the world, removing all the guns is not the solution. Guns aren't the problem.

Guns don't kill people, people do! Those with evil intentions against their fellowman have of late been using cars and trucks to run into crowds of people. Knives and swords have been weapons of choice for ages. Shall we also get rid of all the cars, trucks, knives, etc.? Why not. Using Roberson's logic, that should be the conclusion. Roberson says that the mentally ill are the scapegoat. I respectfully disagree. "Normal" people are not the ones killing other people. Those with some kind of mental problem are.

Then, there is the question about where does the blame go? It is, of course, very easy to place blame on the NRA, thousands are doing it. Those that don't care for guns find the NRA a good fall guy. But that is a very misplaced blame.

The blame goes on our society's inability to ascertain the mental state of a person before they commit a crime. Just because Roberson doesn't like guns, many others do, and enjoy the shooting sports. When guns are used as they are intended, shooting is an enjoyable sport - just as cars can be used in the sport of racing, or used as weapons to kill others.

More restrictions are not the solution either. (I question that a majority of the population want more regulations, as Roberson alleges - there are those who would like us to believe that they do and the election of Mr. Trump, I believe, shows the contrary.) There are presently more than sufficient regulations to manage the exchange of guns for those who can legally have them. The problem is that outlaws don't follow the rules.

Then there is the matter of self defense. It would be very, very nice if our civilization were such that we wouldn't need to defend ourselves. But it isn't.

In closing, I do have to wonder how much effect taking God and prayer out of our schools, and out of our society, and the affect of violent video games have had on our youth and their desire to kill their fellow classmates. It doesn't appear to be all that good.

Gene Shannon

Colorado Springs

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Incognito Mode Your browser is in Incognito mode

You vanished!

We welcome you to read all of our stories by signing into your account. If you don't have a subscription, please subscribe today for daily award winning journalism.

Register to the Colorado Springs Gazette
Subscribe to the Colorado Springs Gazette

It appears that you value local journalism. Thank you.

Subscribe today for unlimited digital access with 50% fewer ads for a faster browsing experience.

Already a Subscriber? LOGIN HERE

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

Wake up with today's top stories in your inbox

or
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 
This is your last FREE article for the month
This is your last FREE article for the month

Subscribe now and enjoy Unlimited Digital Access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?

 
You have reached your article limit for the month
You have reached your article limit for the month

We hope that you've enjoyed your complimentary access to Gazette.com

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber?
Already a digital subscriber?
 

Exclusive Subscriber Content

You read The Gazette because you care about your community and the local stories you can't find anywhere else.

Only 99 cents for Unlimited Digital Access for 1 month
Then $2.31/week, billed monthly, cancel anytime
Already a print subscriber? Get Access | Already a digital subscriber? Log In
 
articles remaining
×
Thank you for your interest in local journalism.
Gain unlimited access, 50% fewer ads and a faster browsing experience.