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LETTERS: Expand library's services; no plan for traffic issues

By: Gazette readers
April 16, 2018 Updated: April 16, 2018 at 4:05 am
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Expand library's reach

Library 21c is an excellent library. The entire county can benefit from classes such as forming nonprofits, homebuying classes, repair cafés and 3D printing. Or can they? There is a dearth of these types of programs on the outskirts of the county.

Communities such as Monument, Fountain and Ellicott are 20 to 25 miles from Library 21c. With classes being held in the day, during working hours, residents are just plain out of luck to take advantage of these resources. Each meeting should have a virtual setup for all other libraries that are closer to these locations. Recordings should be kept as a "library" of these meetings so that if a person misses them, they can at least hear the topics that were discussed.

Lastly, library spokespersons and volunteers need to get the word out about their services. Why not use volunteers to set up a table outside a grocery store or gas station in these outskirt communities to tell residents what information is available at no extra cost? Library 21c, time to take this act on the road both literally and virtually.

Chantal LeGendre

Colorado Springs

No plan for traffic problem

The article "Opposition to N. Cheyenne Canon Plan" notes that critics of the proposed master plan believe that it raises more questions than it answers. This is particularly true of the greatest problem in the park: traffic.

Traffic was the dominant issue raised at public planning open houses, during which several alternatives were put forth, including widening the road throughout the canyon, controlling traffic through narrow portions with traffic lights, and making the road one way.

All the alternatives were rightly rejected by the public as impractical, unaffordable, or too destructive of the character of the canyon. Despite this, city parks staff have put forth a proposed plan which puts off a decision on the traffic problem indefinitely, but would "hit the ground running" with improvements and amenities intended to draw more visitors, and more traffic, to the area.

This is not a solution to the problems in North Cheyenne Canon, but a recipe for creating another Ruxton Avenue situation.

Nor is it necessary for the Parks and Recreation Advisory Board to approve the rest of the plan and deal with traffic later. As parks staff noted, it is possible to do a minor plan amendment. This would seem to be the better course to follow if there are portions of the proposed plan that can be adopted without significantly increasing the traffic problem. However, measures which would add to the traffic burden should not be implemented until a viable traffic control plan is presented and approved.

Jim Lockhart

Colorado Springs

Prepare for bad wildfire season

I have been told by people who live in areas like Woodland Park, Divide and other communities that are small that they cannot afford a super tanker contract. Would it be feasible to have them combine their limited resources with another county?

According to the news, we are facing a bad wildfire season. It would be a shame to see it burn.

Cheryl Sims

Colorado Springs

An attempt to brainwash

I love the arts - movies, plays, TV, operas, and concerts. It's great that people have diverse things they like or dislike, and it's no secret most in the arts are of a liberal persuasion. A TV series I recently watched crossed the line in its intolerance. A character in the series went into an abortion clinic. When asked her name, she wrote "Sarah Palin." This was a lowdown way to make fun of those who are anti-abortion because of a Christian belief.

Hollywood politicizes like this in an attempt to brainwash. By the way, it would be a good thing if high schoolers march for life as they did for gun control.

Faye Padgett

Colorado Springs

Judge's decision disturbing

It was most disturbing to read that a district court judge made a decision that will allow two sex crazed rapists freedom for the rest of their lives and the 13-year-old victim will never be free from the memory of the horrible crime of gang rape committed on her body.

The article did not clarify the reasoning for the judge's decision. Did he not know that a 13-year-old is a child? Her chances to live a normal life are nonexistent while the criminal rapists are free to do as they have done.

Wanda Reaves

Colorado Springs

A twisted thinking disorder

In response to the article "Five reasons sex is good for you," by Karen D'Souza in the April 10, Gazette: I can assure you that a lot of lusty men took comfort in the article's "health benefits" and absolutely no mention of decency, marriage or procreation.

D'Souza lists happiness, banishment of stress, boosting of immunity, brain and heart benefits, but mention of victims like children, spurned spouses, or rape victims are ignored, as well as disease risks. She might consider researching the explosion of STDs among the population that she recommends lots of "exercise" to - like the college population and the aged from 50-89! Yikes! Who hasn't read that nursing homes are experiencing an epidemic of STDs?

Our grandparents would be cringing, I would hope, if anyone had been so gross as to urge them to make sexual fools of themselves.

D'Souza has written other articles about eating out and coffee causing cancer, and avoiding doughnuts. This woman has a twisted thinking disorder. I would recommend that The Gazette avoid her articles from now on.

Sheryl Temaat

Colorado Springs

50 years behind the times

When are the taxpayers of Colorado Springs going to wake up and see that they are living 50 years behind the times? Get the downtown athletic facilities built - the government is even pitching in - which doesn't happen a lot.

Get off the "all I want to do is sit on my couch and look at Pikes Peak mentality" that is so prevalent with the residents.

Remember Oklahoma City and Omaha. They had some foresight and are thriving today.

Patrick Holligan

Tustin, Calif.

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