Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

Gazette Premium Content LETTERS: Culture of death; How the Springs used to be; and more

The Gazette letters Updated: February 6, 2014 at 8:42 am

Thanks to these good Samaritans

I can't stop thinking about the unsung hero on Dublin Ave. (between Union and Academy) this morning. I was travelling west on Dublin just before 8 a.m. The weather was terrible, so I was in the right lane. I saw an SUV ahead of me stopped in the right lane with flashing lights. I put on my flashers but was puzzled - why would an SUV be stuck on a flat, well-traveled road? I slowed down to make sure the car behind me was aware that we needed to merge into the left lane. As I continued (now going downhill), I saw a sad scene - a car had spun and knocked over a street lamp - fully blocking the right lane.

Two kind bystanders stopped to help the obviously traumatized driver. I want to thank all three drivers - the two that helped the crash victim, and especially the driver who bravely parked in the right lane with emergency flashers on.

Our tax dollars pay for police and emergency crews, but we still need to help our fellow citizens in times of need - again, many thanks to these good Samaritans.

Sandra Graham

Colorado Springs

Make some rules, stick to them

Time to put the immigration issue to rest! If immigrants are needed and I don't doubt that they are, and the problem is too many "free riders" on our already overburdened support system, then make some rules and stick to them. I propose allowing anyone to come to this country that can pass a background check. Issue them a government identification card and welcome them in to attend school, work, visit or shop. They are not citizens and have no access to free services or support, just like when I go to another country.

Continue with the legal immigrant citizenship process for those that wish to pursue that path. The downside might be that many low wage starter jobs will be filled with workers to whom even our definition of "poor" is a major step up the economic chain, and the labor unions will probably grouse a bit.

America is having trouble filling those basic labor positions now and the unions could do what unions are supposed to do, organize and protect from exploitation groups of people. If having immigrants is such a threat, why do we have such high unemployment?

Michael S. Welsh

Colorado Springs

How Colorado Springs used to be

How many citizens of Colorado Springs would prefer "pothole-less" streets, clean streets, gutters and medians; green parks and trails and all street lights back on instead of the "City for Champions"? That is how Colorado Springs used to be; clean and welcoming to tourists but not anymore.

Joan Neugebauer

Colorado Springs

Let the people of Colorado Springs decide

I would like to know if someone could answer, what the thinking and financial cost to taxpayers is for tearing down a well operating power plant and rebuilding one somewhere else? Or buying power from someone else?

If the Drake power plant wasn't keeping up with EPA standards, they would shut it down. I have lived in Colorado Springs for 49 years and wonder if anyone thinks about the fact we have some of the cheapest electricity in the U.S. and when they see clouds rising on a cool night, its steam not pollution.

If the powers that be get their way how expensive will our power be?

Also kudos to Kathy Loo for her opinion regarding the name City for Champions revolving around the Olympics when the history that built our city and others around Colorado had nothing to do with the Olympics. Let the people of Colorado Springs decide what we want to be known for, not just a select few with money and power. The theory, build it and they will come doesn't always come true, nor does it mean long term good paying jobs and growth that would sustain this community for years to come.

I would also like to thank Council President Keith King and others on the council for trying to get facts about exactly how much the taxpayers will have to pay.

Virginia Andrew

Colorado Springs

Law aimed at the working class

The article "Attempt to repeal gun law fails" shows the real target of the background checks on private gun sales is not criminals. (Feb. 4) Matt Solomon owner of Alpine Arms testified that it would cost him between $50 and $100 to do a background check on a private gun sale. For this reason he refuses to do the checks . Contacting local gun stores shows that few will do the check and they are charging $30 to $40 to sell a $100 .22 target rifle. If the buyer fails the check the owner of the rifle will have to pay $10 for a background check to get his gun back.

It is obvious that this law is aimed at the working class and the poor by making the cost to buy a used gun prohibitive.

Jill Coleman

Colorado Springs

The culture of death with humans

Kudos to Jerry Kiazura ("Later generations saw the evil", Gazette, Feb.4) for his excellent observations concerning how we have become complacent with the killing of millions of babies in the womb each year, with little media or other coverage, while we become incensed with the torture and killing of a little kitten. That is not to say this isn't a horrible act, but why not recognize the culture of death with humans? Kiazura references how we now reflect on the horrors of tolerating slavery, and the extermination of Jews in Germany, but not at the time of occurrence.

When are we going to recognize the monstrous evil occurring each and every day today?

Bill Offutt

Colorado Springs

Thanks to these good Samaritans

I can't stop thinking about the unsung hero on Dublin Avenue (between Union and Academy) this morning. I was headed west on Dublin just before 8 a.m. The weather was terrible, so I was in the right lane. I saw an SUV ahead of me stopped in the right lane with flashing lights. I put on my flashers but was puzzled - why would an SUV be stuck on a flat, well-traveled road? I slowed down to make sure the car behind me was aware that we needed to merge into the left lane. As I continued (now going downhill), I saw a sad scene - a car had spun and knocked over a street lamp - fully blocking the right lane.

Two kind bystanders stopped to help the obviously traumatized driver. I want to thank all three drivers - the two that helped the crash victim, and especially the driver who bravely parked in the right lane with emergency flashers on.

Our tax dollars pay for police and emergency crews, but we still need to help our fellow citizens in times of need - again, many thanks to these good Samaritans.

Sandra Graham

Colorado Springs

Make some rules, stick to them

Time to put the immigration issue to rest! If immigrants are needed and I don't doubt that they are, and the problem is too many "free riders" on our already overburdened support system, then make some rules and stick to them. I propose allowing anyone to come to this country that can pass a background check. Issue them a government identification card and welcome them in to attend school, work, visit or shop. They are not citizens and have no access to free services or support, just like when I go to another country.

Continue with the legal immigrant citizenship process for those that wish to pursue that path. The downside might be that many low wage starter jobs will be filled with workers to whom even our definition of "poor" is a major step up the economic chain, and the labor unions will probably grouse a bit.

America is having trouble filling those basic labor positions now and the unions could do what unions are supposed to do, organize and protect from exploitation groups of people. If having immigrants is such a threat, why do we have such high unemployment?

Michael S. Welsh

Colorado Springs

How Colorado Springs used to be

How many citizens of Colorado Springs would prefer "pothole-less" streets, clean streets, gutters and medians; green parks and trails and all street lights back on instead of the "City for Champions"? That is how Colorado Springs used to be; clean and welcoming to tourists but not anymore.

Joan Neugebauer

Colorado Springs

Let the people decide

I would like to know if someone could answer, what the thinking and financial cost to taxpayers is for tearing down a well operating power plant and rebuilding one somewhere else? Or buying power from someone else?

If the Drake power plant wasn't keeping up with EPA standards, they would shut it down. I have lived in Colorado Springs for 49 years and wonder if anyone thinks about the fact we have some of the cheapest electricity in the U.S. and when they see clouds rising on a cool night, its steam not pollution. If the powers that be get their way how expensive will our power be?

Also kudos to Kathy Loo for her opinion regarding the name City for Champions revolving around the Olympics when the history that built our city and others around Colorado had nothing to do with the Olympics. Let the people of Colorado Springs decide what we want to be known for, not just a select few with money and power. The theory, build it and they will come doesn't always come true, nor does it mean long-term good paying jobs and growth that would sustain this community for years to come.

I would also like to thank Council President Keith King and others on the council for trying to get facts about exactly how much the taxpayers will have to pay.

Virginia Andrew

Colorado Springs

Law aimed at the working class

The article "Attempt to repeal gun law fails" shows the real target of the background checks on private gun sales is not criminals. (Feb. 4) Matt Solomon owner of Alpine Arms testified that it would cost him between $50 and $100 to do a background check on a private gun sale. For this reason he refuses to do the checks. Contacting local gun stores shows that few will do the check and they are charging $30 to $40 to sell a $100 .22 target rifle. If the buyer fails the check the owner of the rifle will have to pay $10 for a background check to get his gun back.

It is obvious that this law is aimed at the working class and the poor by making the cost to buy a used gun prohibitive.

Jill Coleman

Colorado Springs

The culture of death with humans

Kudos to Jerry Kiazura ("Later generations saw the evil", Gazette, Feb. 4) for his excellent observations concerning how we have become complacent with the killing of millions of babies in the womb each year, with little media or other coverage, while we become incensed with the torture and killing of a little kitten. That is not to say this isn't a horrible act, but why not recognize the culture of death with humans? Kiazura references how we now reflect on the horrors of tolerating slavery, and the extermination of Jews in Germany, but not at the time of occurrence.

When are we going to recognize the monstrous evil occurring each and every day today?

Bill Offutt

Colorado Springs

Comment Policy

Our commenting system has changed. Please register or login with your gazette.com account to comment on a story. Click here for information.

You've reached 4 FREE premium stories this month

Simply register to continue. It's free.

Register Learn more

Already registered? Click here to login.

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
SEP
23
SEP
24
SEP
25
SEP
26
SEP
27
SEP
28
SEP
29
SEP
30
OCT
1
OCT
2
OCT
3
OCT
4
OCT
5
OCT
6
Advertisement