Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

LETTERS: City of cavernous potholes; possessing a firearm illegally

Letters Published: March 12, 2014 0

A city of cavernous potholes

They actually fixed a pothole. On South Carefree in the eastbound lanes headed down the hill from the Homestead Trail toward Powers was a huge, and I mean huge, pothole referred to by some in the neighborhood as the Carefree Cavern, and by others as the Bug Hole, as it would easily swallow a VW bug. And the other day after it had existed for a long time, it was filled. Of course, in the eastbound and westbound lanes a quarter mile or so in each direction, there were another 50 or so holes of various sizes [none of cavern dimensions] that were not filled.

Someone said that one way to get potholes filled was to take a picture and send it to the street department. I thought of doing this but couldn't find a good overhead shot of the city to send.

Rod Summitt, Colorado Springs

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It's not rocket science

I'd like to address a common problem that many Colorado Springs drivers seem to have, namely the inability to merge correctly. The drivers here don't seem to understand the proper way to merge into traffic.

The merge lane is just that, you keep going and merge into traffic; you don't stop in the merge lane and wait for an opening, backing up traffic behind you. It's not rocket science. It's called a merge lane; it's not a stop sign. Case in point where I see the most difficulties: merging onto Powers Boulevard southbound from Research Parkway.

I realize that when cars are coming, it can be a little nerve wracking, but people need to keep in motion and cars will let you in. That is the proper way to merge. Please do not stop in the merge lane! Be considerate of other drivers.

Scott Martin, Colorado Springs

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Potential that is so often overlooked

High-five to Stefanie Norred for her editorial, "Hiring disabled makes good business sense." While most employers have a bias against hiring people with any type of disability, the opportunity for including staff that are reliable, dedicated and motivated sounds like a dream come true for businesses in Colorado.

Jill Ruben is an excellent example of a valued employee. Jill has been blessed with a fantastic family and a positive spirit that spills over in her work. I have to admit that I know Jill. We share a common passion for Colorado College Tiger hockey (many people know her as the "dancing lady" at their home games). The point is, she represents the potential that is so often overlooked or disregarded in the work force. What a pity.

We should feel encouraged that a community of social enterprises has begun to grow in our city. Blue Star has been a leader and a model for other companies that are willing to look at a person's ability rather than eliminating them based on a label. Bottom line, be willing to look outside of the box and hire the best person for the job.

Karen Fulghum, Colorado Springs

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Are we really all that shocked?

As we watch with feigned surprise the events in Eastern Europe unwind with startling rapidity, are we really all that shocked that Russia would make a play for its historic satellite, the Crimea or the Ukraine?

I, for one, am not surprised that, 80 years after the Berlin Olympics, meant to showcase Nazi Germany's superiority - no thanks to Jesse Owens who beat the so-called Aryans - shielded the horrors that were only the beginning of totalitarian Germany's terrible reign, the Russians' vaunted $50 billion Olympic debut seems to have been a bait-and-switch for the clever nabbing of the Crimea.

And we Western powers, once again feckless, fret about minimum wage and talk of 100,000 soldier reductions in force while Russia invades and China implements a 12 percent military spending increase.

I would be nervous if I were Czechoslovakia or Poland, as nary a century has passed since the West abandoned their countries to German and Russian expansionism. Sure, there's NATO now, but we don't seem ready to scramble jets or deploy for merely the Ukraine. Vladimir Putin does not care about dips in the value of the ruble as compared to the restoration of a Russian empire. His memory is long, and we worry only about ticker symbols. It seems that instead of "Barry" Obama, we have a "Neville" on our hands.

Kevin Kaveney, Colorado Springs

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Rather be free and broke

So the sheriff is above his own rules because he is elected. Sounds just like most of those in D.C. - above the law, accountable to no one. A good leader sets the standards and is a model for all to emulate. I see now that the sheriff is one of those do as I say not as I do. Why is everyone there afraid of retribution? Have they done something wrong, speaking the truth? When I have to ask permission to endorse a candidate, I no longer am an American citizen, protected by law, but ruled by dictator. If I worked at the will of the sheriff, would I keep quiet and keep my job? That would be just one more right I give up in order to have a job. I'd rather be free and broke than to work under a dictator. Sheriff Maketa: Lead by example or step down from your position. By the way, you do answer to the voters, regardless of what you think.

Tim Johnson, Colorado Springs

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Penalty for illegal gun possession

With the rash of gun crimes in our city, I've noticed a common phrase. "Possession of a crime by a previous offender" is in each incident many times followed by the word homicide. If our lawmakers and anti-gun friends would take note, maybe they could return our constitutional gun rights and direct their attention to the real problem. If the penalty for possessing a firearm illegally is severe enough, maybe they won't possess it. But maybe I give too much credit to the criminal mind and maybe others have an agenda that doesn't include really stopping gun crime.

Gene Wright, Colorado Springs

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