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LETTERS: Christians not called to break the law; health care

By: Gazette readers
June 21, 2017 Updated: June 21, 2017 at 11:39 am
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Christians not called to be lawless

In Sunday's Gazette there was an article entitled "Springs Church to Offer Sanctuary." This was disconcerting and frustrating on a variety of levels. I'm hoping our community realizes that just as there are different political spectrums - Democrats and Republicans, liberals and conservatives, those on the left and those on the right - so are there similar divisions and polarized world views within church denominations and among Christians. This Colorado Springs Sanctuary Coalition is a case in point. While Christians are to be compassionate and caring, they are not called to be lawless and rebellious. These churches mentioned in this coalition are mostly left-leaning or liberal churches. The Unitarian Universalist "Church" is not even considered an orthodox Christian church among scholars but actually a sect.

Of course illegal immigrants (undocumented workers?) can be understood as "fellow believers" and Christians. But, they are breaking the law knowingly and willfully and so are the churches that are harboring them. Willful breaking of the law is what the Bible calls "sin."

Rev. Thomas Latham

Colorado Springs

   

Need for regulations, enforcement

Regarding the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette opinion, "Inferno highlights high-rise risk" (June 18), there are lessons beyond the "increased vigilance on the part of apartment dwellers everywhere." Per the piece, a tenant group warned the borough and the company of fire-safety issues. Sounds like the residents were being responsible and vigilant but not the borough or the company.

First and foremost, building codes and regulations should be sufficiently strict for all structures to insure the safety of occupants. Second, there should be sufficient numbers of inspectors to identify violations and ensure that they be corrected. Penalties for companies that build substandard buildings should include debarment for extended periods from government contracts, jail time for executives responsible and fines. And government officials who ignore safety issues should face criminal charges as well.

We live in a time when some government officials often want to cut regulations to stimulate business regardless of the cost to others. Without regulations, one cannot assume that businesses will act in an ethical manner while creating their product or service; hence there is a need for robust regulations, enforcement and penalties sufficient to prevent profit at any cost.

Mary J. Talbott

Colorado Springs

   

Pitts' column spews hatred

Reference the 'op-ed' pages of the June 18, Gazette, there are many well-thought out, well-written pieces by the many authors, but then I read Leonard Pitts' column. He tried to be introspective and thoughtful, but his absolute hate for this administration and the Republicans blocked his effort.

He again takes a partial quote by President Donald Trump's son (with rude reference to him as Donald Trump, Jr. instead of his real name, Eric) totally out of context, not including the whole quote, to spew his line of hate. Can we just get rid of his column? It is never balanced even today when his theme was to deal with the problem. It does nothing, ever, to serve the possible hope for racial unity of this great country.

LaMar P. Craig

Colorado Springs

   

Bring back traffic cameras

Union Boulevard between N. Academy and Van Buren and Constitution Blvd. between Union and Paseo have become raceways where everyone tries to see how fast they can go in a seven block stretch at all hours of the day and night. Very few drivers observe neighborhood speed limits of 25 mph. A lot of drivers no longer even try to stop for red lights. It's become dangerous to cross streets even with the walk light, because many drivers do not understand the concept that pedestrians might actually have the right-of-way.

Please, please, please bring back red-light cameras and speed cameras. The first-year costs might be high, but the payback to city coffers after initial expenses could be substantial. I'd rather some idiot driver have his privacy invaded by the cameras than have the side or front of my car (and possibly my body) invaded by their car when they smash into me while driving like a fool.

Mary Jo Piccin

Colorado Springs

   

Ruling diminished workers' rights

The current administration continues it's march toward obliterating every accomplishment made by former President Barack Obama. Last Friday, President Trump's administration reversed its stand on arbitration agreements, thus diminishing workers rights and further empowering employers and corporations to stop collective bargaining. President Obama fought for the National Labor Relations Board's stance on this issue.

The Supreme Court will soon take on this case. Our new administration flip-flopped from their original stance on the matter. These agreements make the person filing a complaint for wages owed etc., arbitrate on their own. This weakens the power that is gained by persuing as a group.

President Donald Trump has again departed from his campaign promise to espouse workers rights. If you are a worker who has a better life because a relative, friend or forefather belonged to a Union and fought for the rights and wages you now have, you have just been slapped in the face, again.

Michael Pattison

Black Forest

   

Take a look at other health plans

Thanks for printing the well thought out editorial from "The Aurora Daily Sentinel" in Monday's Gazette.

If commentators, and others in the know are right, it seems that what will eventually appear from behind closed Senate doors will be much worse than the present attempt at universal health care.

I also wonder why our so called leaders don't take an in-depth look at the universal health care plans in countries around the world? Then they can pick and choose those elements that are working, and use them as the basis for our own health care system, adapting them as needed.

Bob Armintor

Colorado Springs

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