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Iraq-After Mosul

By: Felipe Dana, Associated Press
May 18, 2017
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photo - FILE - In this Thursday, March 23, 2017 file photo, displaced Iraqis, fleeing fighting between Iraqi security forces and Islamic State militants, wait for a security check before being transferred to a camp on the western side of Mosul, Iraq. Iraq’s Sunni minority is pushing for a greater say in power once the Islamic State group is defeated, reflecting a growing sentiment that the country’s government must be more inclusive to prevent extremism from gaining ground once again. But so far, many Shiite politicians are wary, and the Sunni leadership is divided and disorganized. The danger is that Iraq will fall into the same sectarian cycle that has plagued it for more than a decade. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
FILE - In this Thursday, March 23, 2017 file photo, displaced Iraqis, fleeing fighting between Iraqi security forces and Islamic State militants, wait for a security check before being transferred to a camp on the western side of Mosul, Iraq. Iraq’s Sunni minority is pushing for a greater say in power once the Islamic State group is defeated, reflecting a growing sentiment that the country’s government must be more inclusive to prevent extremism from gaining ground once again. But so far, many Shiite politicians are wary, and the Sunni leadership is divided and disorganized. The danger is that Iraq will fall into the same sectarian cycle that has plagued it for more than a decade. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File) 
FILE - In this Thursday, March 23, 2017 file photo, displaced Iraqis, fleeing fighting between Iraqi security forces and Islamic State militants, wait for a security check before being transferred to a camp on the western side of Mosul, Iraq.
Iraq’s Sunni minority is pushing for a greater say in power once the Islamic State group is defeated, reflecting a growing sentiment that the country’s government must be more inclusive to prevent extremism from gaining ground once again. But so far, many Shiite politicians are wary, and the Sunni leadership is divided and disorganized. The danger is that Iraq will fall into the same sectarian cycle that has plagued it for more than a decade. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana, File)
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