Has anyone considered prayer? Dire need of truth

Letters Published: June 15, 2013 | 12:00 am 0

Has anyone considered prayer?

The Gazette headline blared the question Thursday: What will it take to stop the Black Forest fire north of Colorado Springs? Sheriff Terry Maketa echoed what amounted to an answer when he said "... nobody can deliver ... a break from the wind."

Has anyone considered prayer? We don't know how or why this fire started, but we do know God hears the cry of his people. When all else fails, why not turn to the Lord in prayer? Better yet, why not turn to him first?

Jere Joiner

Colorado Springs

A clear loss of faith and trust

E.J. Dionne is wrong in saying that the "libertarian utopia in the late 19th century. did not work".

From 1861 to 1913 U.S. real GDP - in constant 2005 dollars - went from 84 to 600 billion; per capita GDP went from 2,600 to 6,170 dollars.

The United States became the world's greatest industrial power, while absorbing over 30 million mostly poor immigrants and providing them with education, jobs and a future.

Under the conditions of the time it worked extremely well. There were obvious flaws - inequality, exploitation, political corruption - but they were dealt with through the democratic process.

The post-WWII, center-left welfare state similarly delivered for half a century, but is now showing its own weaknesses: budgetary overreach, mismanagement, political corruption.

There is clear loss of faith and trust in government.

Right and Left are increasingly the templates of the past. We need a new consensus, free of ideology, to build the future.

Jacek Popiel

Colorado Springs

Arrogantly ignoring mandates

Cheryl Moore is right on. Our elected officials may have been elected with the most votes, but few have been elected with a majority of the votes. How many times have we heard an elected official who won with 40 percent of the votes (6 out of 10 voters voted against them) claim to have a "mandate from the people"?

Yet, when a majority of the voters actually vote for something they arrogantly ignore a true "mandate of the people."

Every elected official who votes contrary to a direct vote of the people should be recalled.

Bill Schaffner

Colorado Springs

Still a denial of civil rights

I am always saddened to read when someone believes their civil rights are more important than another person's civil rights. The column by Ed Jones in the June 12 Gazette reflects such a belief.

The violent acts inflicted on black Americans in this country were and are unforgiveable as is the degree to which black Americans were denied their civil rights. However, violent acts of any kind inflicted on any human being are still violent acts. Being beaten to death for being gay as was Matthew Sheppard was a violent act. The mass round-ups of gay men in Texas in the 1940s and 1950s, their incarceration for no reason than that they were gay, and their sodomization while in jail was pure violence. In other words violence is violence no matter the type or the degree.

The issue is not whether black Americans and gay Americans have been subjected to equal degrees of violence. The issue is whether any American has or is being denied civil rights for whatever reason. Denial of the right to marry for gay Americans is denial of a civil right. Unfortunately, Jones seems determined to compare degrees of violence and not to recognize that all Americans, whatever their ethnicity, faith, gender or sexual orientation should not be denied civil rights.

Judith Broverman

Colorado Springs

Beauty is all around us

A recent letter to The Gazette (written by Jaye Smart), implied that Colorado Springs is no longer beautiful because of water restrictions. I moved back here from Florida recently and am so happy to be back here.

There is beauty all around us. That's what makes the Springs such a wonderful place to live. What is sad is to think that people believe water is an unlimited resource and that for our city to be beautiful, the grass must be green. Let's look on the other side of the fence and imagine what it would be like to live someplace where we did not have running water to shower or clean drinking water; then we really would have something to complain about.

Stacy Sahlstrom

Colorado Springs

In dire need of truth

The phrase "whistle-blower" should be retired and be replaced by the phrase "truth advocate". The former phrase is too pejorative and the latter phrase is more positive. When I was in the Discipline Office in School District 11, I told my students in the due process hearings that the word "snitch" was invented by someone who did something wrong and got caught. Our country is in dire need of truth these days. One of my idols was the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr. with whom I marched and met in (of all places) Chicago in the summer of 1965. One of Dr. King's hallmark statements was "The truth shall set you free". Wouldn't it be great if President Obama, Eric Holder, Valerie Jarrett, Congress and all public officials were truth advocates. We can handle the truth - it's lying and dishonesty that we can't handle. We can only be set free by being truthful - period. Thank you, Dad (R.I.P.), for successfully raising five children that could handle the truth. Happy celestial Father's Day!

Roger W. Louden

Gleneagle

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