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Green Market features handmade items by Colorado artisans

August 5, 2016 Updated: August 5, 2016 at 4:10 am
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photo - Artist Susan Williams doodles in her journal while working the Heart Seed Studio booth Sunday, May, 8, 2016, during the Maker Fair of handcrafted artisan items at the City Auditorium in Colorado Springs. The next festival, Green Market, will be Aug. 6, 2016, in Acacia Park. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock)
Artist Susan Williams doodles in her journal while working the Heart Seed Studio booth Sunday, May, 8, 2016, during the Maker Fair of handcrafted artisan items at the City Auditorium in Colorado Springs. The next festival, Green Market, will be Aug. 6, 2016, in Acacia Park. (The Gazette, Christian Murdock) 

10 a.m.-4 p.m. Saturday, Acacia Park, 115 E. Platte Ave., free; makerfair.org

Natural, organic, up-cycled and vintage.

You won't find any other type of products at the Green Market by Maker Fair Handcrafted Artisan Festivals.

The free festival is Saturday in Acacia Park.

"People are taking computer parts and turning them into jewelry," says Sara Krosch, founder and producer of the Maker Fair Handcrafted Artisan Festivals. "They're taking old fabrics and refashioning them into funky baby wear. The idea is that it's inspiring. People go online or on Pinterest and see ideas, and this is where they'll see artists who took these ideas and turned them into something people want to buy, wear or eat."

About 50 artisans from around Colorado will set up shop in the park, including TechWears, which turns electronic circuit boards into neckties, cufflinks, earring and pendants; pet portraits by Off the Leash Art; and wearable art by Boho Belles, which features recycled brass chain earrings and bangles made from magazine paper.

The family-friendly event caters to its younger visitors with areas for make- and-take crafts and a gnome scavenger hunt with prizes.

"Everything is juried," Krosch says. "One deciding factor is we ask artists to tell their story. They have to compete with stuff on big store shelves. Every artist has a story, whether it's grandma taught them how to quilt or they retired from the military and started crafting their own line of hot sauces. It's memorable and connects them with audiences. You get to know the person through their products."

Krosch's own story involves coconut oil. She learned to make it in 2000 as a Peace Corps volunteer in Micronesia, sold scented body oils in 2008 in American Samoa with her partner, and in 2012 in the Philippines they created Just Coco, a line of virgin coconut oil body care. They now split their time between the U.S. and the Philippines.

"It's a fun way to have a shopping experience," she says about the festival. "There's a lot of local talent around. I want people to seek out from people who have their business in Colorado."

JENNIFER MULSON, THE GAZETTE, 636-0270, JEN.MULSON@GAZETTE.COM

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