Colorado Springs News, Sports & Business

Gazette Premium Content Gold Camp Road destruction; understanding tornados

Letters Published: June 2, 2013

 

 

Destruction of a beautiful area

I recently traveled to Colorado Springs from Oklahoma City for my son's high school graduation. While there, we took the Jeeps up Gold Camp Road to wheel the Eagle Rock trail. While driving up Gold Camp Road we were totally appalled at the amount of destruction done and the amount of trash left by people shooting, camping and four-wheeling in that area. This is not a landfill, but it was apparent to me and to others, that this is exactly what is happening to this area. Everything from computer monitors to TVs and the state's trees are being used as target practice and being left behind.

Before moving to Oklahoma City in 2010 I was a resident of Colorado for 30 years, and have enjoyed jeeping most of the state. I am an avid shooter and hunter, also, and have to say this was done by a small percentage of the shooting community.

After returning back home from my recent trip, I contacted the Pikes Peak Ranger District to see what could be done to solve this problem. I was told by the person that answered the phone that there was one person responsible to patrol that area and that they could not do much about it.

I have a suggestion that I think may help to control the amount of destruction and littering that takes place up there. There needs to be a minimum of two rangers in these areas to patrol during peak times, such as weekends. Tickets need to be written when anyone leaves a single piece of trash or shoots one single tree. These tickets should be a minimum of $1,000, plus a minimum of 20 hours of community service. These community service hours would be spent cleaning up the same area that they have been destroying.

It saddens me to know that this beautiful area has been taken for granted and abused by so many people. It takes just one person to make a difference, and I think that it needs to start now.

Kurt D. Lehman, Oklahoma City

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Tornado activity poorly understood

Re: Global warming editorial, May 26. An increase in mean global temperature adds significant energy to climate systems. Climate models and historical data show that this produces greater weather extremes of all sorts. Unusual dry, cold and hot spells, as well as increases in violent storm activity, are all predicted by climate change theories.

The only reason climate scientists and educated laymen (liberal or not) discount cold winters as evidence against climate change is that cold winters are, in fact, predicted by climate change models. As for the stretch of low tornado activity, current models are unclear regarding the degree to which a reduction in wind shear due to decrease in temperature difference across latitudes will compensate for the increase in atmospheric energy as the mean global temperature rises. The relationship between these two variables (among others) may lead to more or fewer tornadoes. Any climate scientist, if asked, would acknowledge that the future of tornado activity is poorly understood at present but the relationship between climate change and cold winters is not.

Jerry R. Jackson, Colorado Springs

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