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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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The caption under this photo, which appeared in The Gazette Telegraph on May 28, 1958, read: “Officers of the Colorado Springs Chapter of B’nai Brith Youth Organization held it’s installation of officers Tuesday night at B’nai Israel Synagogue. Seated are (from left) Adrianne Goldstein, treasurer; Becky Kushnir, president, and Barbara Wald, vice president, while in back (from left) are Syd Balows, corresponding secretary; Mary Ellen Braun, sergeant-atarms, and Maurice Mendel, reporter. Not present was Kathy Berg, recording secretary. Irwin Wald, vice president of B’nai Brith, was the installing officer.” PHOTO BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-11813

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A woman and a young girl stand in a grassy yard with wrought-iron fence behind them and large houses visible across the street. The notes on the print read: “Front yard, W.W. Hassell home 1924 Wood Ave., about 1900” and “Child is Julia Hassell.” “May 1900” is written on the back of the card. JOHN LIPSEY PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 304-5285

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This 1874 hand-colored wood engraving shows a covered wagon on the prairie with “Pikes Peak or Bust” written on the side. The legs of man wearing only one boot are visible behind scrub brush, with a broken rifle, a whip and the other boot on the ground nearby. Two oxen are hitched to the wagon, one lying on the ground and the other standing with several arrows embedded in its side. A buffalo stands nearby watching the group. Several large birds fly overhead. “Jim Smith” (with the J reversed) is written on the wagon board. “Bust! — W.M. Cary” is printed below the image. LITHOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 257-6377

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This 1901 view of the old City Hall shows it draped in black bunting, with flag at half-mast and policemen in front of building. This was likely done to commemorate the death of President William McKinley. McKinley was assassinated in Buffalo, N.Y., in September 1901, six months into his second term. MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-75

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Railroad tracks cut through snowbanks on Pikes Peak in this May 1900 photograph. In the late 1880s, Zalmon Simmons — founder of the Simmons Beautyrest Mattress Co. — recognized the potential of a railway up the mountain after an arduous mule ride up Pikes Peak. He founded the Manitou and Pikes Peak Railway Co. in 1889, and track construction began. On June 30, 1891, a passenger train carrying a church choir from Denver was the first to make it to the summit. PHOTO BY F.P. STEVENS, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-109

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Handwritten on the bottom front of this May 6, 1912, photograph: “Senior Class 1911½-1912 C.S.H.S.” and “Pikers’ Day May 6, 1912” and “South Cheyenne Canon. Colo. -1912”. Handwritten on the back of the photo: “Standing John McCaffery, Adin Brooks, Edgar Taylor, Harry Best, (3 unknown), I. B. Bruce, (4 unknown), Alice Berry, (1 unknown), Hattie Brooks, (3 unknown), Bessie Woodring, John Dixon. / Next row seated: Helen Leipheiner, Hazel Harper, Carolyn Latas, [unknown], Nana Dukey, Charlotte Allward, Harriett Bartlett, Irene Bartholomew, Marjorie Brown, Mary Bernap, (unknown), Eva (?). / Front row seated on ground, On donkies: Floyd McCammon and John Jacobs / Newton Holman, Grace Brown, Madre Merrill, Frank Hall, Glen Weber, Fred Morath.” MARGARETTA M. BOAS PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 001-7406

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The caption under this photo that appeared in The Gazette Telegraph on Sept. 30, 1951, reads: “Mrs. Robert Heinlein shows how the dining table in the new Heinlein home travels thru an opening in the wall between the living room and the kitchen. The swinging door beneath the table may be opened to allow the table to be pulled entirely into the living room. In the corner at the upper right is a loudspeaker connected to a central phono-radio station in the hall. The doorway to the kitchen shows one of the sliding doors used thruout the home.” Famed science-fiction writer Robert Heinlein and his wife lived in a home they designed on Mesa Avenue near The Broadmoor hotel. The custom home was featured in Popular Mechanics. PHOTO BY STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-9563

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