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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

A Look Back

Images from Colorado Springs' past

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Printed on the front of this 1935 postcard: “Famous Summit House at Top of Pikes Peak, Alt. 14,110 ft.” Note on similar photo: “Upon the tower of this building is a long distance telescope and a 300,000 candle power searchlight. Within the building is a Western Union telegraph office, the highest in the world, and scientific instruments for cloud study and weather observation.” The first structure to stand atop Pikes Peak was a two-room stone weather station; the Army’s Pikes Peak Weather Observatory was dedicated on Oct. 11, 1873. The Army abandoned the weather station in 1888. It was taken over by Dr. Alfred G. Lewis, a physician and the mayor of Manitou Springs, who started selling doughnuts and coffee to tourists, but that enterprise only lasted a few years. Cog Rail owners restored and enhanced the unused signal station after being granted an easement by the Department of Interior in 1892 for a train terminal and guest house on the summit, says a history on pikespeak. us.com. In 1917, a second summit house was built on the western side of the summit to serve the growing number of tourists coming up the mountain; fire destroyed that building in 1953, leaving only the original summit house. That structure was demolished in the 1960s to make way for the current building. A new complex atop the mountain is in the works. POSTCARD COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 208-9877

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The Jan. 18, 1948, Gazette Telegraph had a story on this young polio survivor. “Elsie Wycoff, 12-year-old, was stricken with the dread virus five years ago,” the story read. “She is now able to walk without a brace, and before long may be able to throw away her crutches.” The first polio vaccine was available in the United States in 1955, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. STANLEY L. PAYNE, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-10537

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The caption under this photo, which ran in The Gazette Telegraph on May 29, 1949, read: “Van Del Roe, 14, son of Mr. and Mrs. Carl Roe, 616 S. Cascade Ave., is shown with his Soap Box Derby racer, first to be constructed in preparation for the Colorado Springs race on July 24. With Van is ‘Lucky’ his mascot and playmate during the rest periods while the racer was under construction. Van, a student at South Junior High school, based his construction plans for his racer on those outlined in the official rule book. He says he had no trouble in following thru all the phases of the project. Derby officials say he has a racer which has streamlined qualities and speed sufficient to give other entries a good race for the trip to Akron, for the national finals.” STAN PAYNE COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 004-10618

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The Myron Stratton Home is seen in this August 1930 photo. The Myron Stratton Home, off South Nevada Avenue, is named for the father of millionaire and philanthropist Winfield Scott Stratton. It opened in 1913, in accordance with Stratton’s will, as “a free home for poor persons who are without means of support and who are physically unable by reason of old age, youth, sickness or other infirmity to earn a livelihood.” PHOTO BY CLARENCE G. COIL, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-443

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A front view of The Gazette Telegraph building on Pikes Peak Avenue is seen in this 1950 photograph. Megel’s Jewelry Store is next door. The history of The Gazette Telegraph dates back to Colorado Springs founder Gen. William Jackson Palmer’s creation of Out West in 1872. Out West became The Weekly Gazette a year later, then The Daily Gazette in 1878. After a series of owners, the morning paper was sold in 1906 to Clarence Dodge, who also bought the Colorado Springs Telegraph, an evening newspaper. Decades of ownership by the Hoiles family began when family members purchased the two newspapers in 1946. A combined evening/Sunday Gazette Telegraph began publishing a year later. The morning edition was discontinued but returned in 1977; a decade later, the afternoon edition was dropped. In 1997, the newspaper dropped Telegraph from its name, becoming The Gazette. The Anschutz Corp.’s Clarity Media Group has owned The Gazette since late 2012. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-981

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Three men and a child stand outside the Stewart & Tiger bicycle shop at 511 W. Colorado Ave. in Colorado City in this 1901 photograph. Colorado City (now Old Colorado City) was established in 1859 during the Pikes Peak gold rush as a supply town and commercial staging area, according to a history at visitoldcoloradocity.org/about. Miners would buy supplies in town and then make their way up Ute Pass to try their luck. It was in Kansas Territory at the time, but it became the capital of Colorado Territory in 1861. Its status as capital was shortlived, however, primarily because it didn’t have any place for legislators to stay. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-954

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This 1925 photograph shows a truck with the sign “Stewart Bros.” by a shack with four men. The note on back states: “Shack at Mile 14 where hot dogs & coffee were sold at races. L to R C. Coil, two helpers & Ben H. Stewart of Stewart Bros.” Ben H. and Orrie W. Stewart came to Colorado from Kansas as boys, attended public schools in Colorado Springs, and later studied chemistry at Colorado College, according to the Pikes Peak Library District. The Stewart Brothers opened their first store in Manitou Springs in 1906. In 1912, they opened a larger store in Colorado Springs. Their business grew to include a photo craft shop, a warehouse and an engraving plant. STEWARTS COMMERCIAL PHOTOGRAPH COLLECTION, COURTESY OF PIKES PEAK LIBRARY DISTRICT, 013-1072

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