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Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

Fun facts from The Broadmoor's first 100 years - Part 3

In the 100 days prior to The Broadmoor's 100th anniversary celebration, The Gazette is collecting 100 fun facts about the rich and colorful history of that landmark Colorado Springs institution. Here are Nos. 21-30.

21. Forget the stairs, take the escalator!

21. Forget the stairs, take the escalator!

In 1953, an escalator was installed between the hotel lobby and mezzanine floor of The Broadmoor to improve service between the areas. It was the first escalator installation in a hotel in the Rocky Mountains.

SOURCE: Broadmoor archives. Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

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22. Theater’s doors remain open
22. Theater’s doors remain open
The Broadmoor Little Theater opened in 1918 and staged plays. It reopened as a first-run movie house on July 4, 1948, with Walt Disney’s “Song of the South.” Movies showed nightly, and prices were the same as at downtown theaters: 65 cents for adults and 20 cents for children. Movies continue to be shown at the theater, free to hotel guests;recent  films included “Wonder,” “Justice League” and “Leap!”
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives. Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

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23. A peek at the top of The Broadmoor
23. A peek at the top of The Broadmoor 
The Broadmoor opened in 1918 with a rooftop garden on the main building. It allowed entrance to the belfry, which was the equivalent of 11 stories high. This was surmounted by a lighted weather vane and a “lantern of unique design” in wrought iron. Today the garden is gone, but the original weather vane and lantern remain.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives. Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

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24. Riding not into the sunset, but into the lobby
24. Riding not into the sunset, but into the lobby
While many famous guests have passed through the doors of The Broadmoor, only one has ridden his horse into the lobby. That was cowboy star Montie Montana, as part of a publicity stunt to promote the 1959 World Figure Skating Championships at the Broadmoor Ice Palace. Montana became known for riding his horses into such famed places as the top of the Empire State Building. He also made headlines when he roped President Dwight D. Eisenhower during Ike’s 1953 inaugural parade in Washington; though Eisenhower had OK’d the stunt, Secret Service agents reportedly were not amused.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives, Gazette research. Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

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25. No appetite for silverware on hog farm
25. No appetite for silverware on hog farm
In the early days, The Broadmoor had its own hog farm, south of the hotel off of what is now Colorado 115. Food waste was trucked to the farm to be fed to the pigs, which in turn were slaughtered for use at the hotel. Unfortunately, many pieces of silverware were thrown out with the food waste; fortunately, the pigs had no appetite for silverware.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives.  Photo courtesy The Broadmoor

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26. Enjoying the beaches — and the frigid water
26. Enjoying the beaches — and the frigid water
When The Broadmoor opened, three sandy beaches lined Cheyenne Lake — one for guests, one for employees and the third for the public. The beaches remained open until the early 1960s. For a short time in the ‘60s, water skiing was offered in the lake. Instruction was given, and guests were inspired to learn quickly since the lake water came from a reservoir and rarely got above 50 degrees.
SOURCE: “The Broadmoor Story.” Photo courtesy The Broadmoor

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27. That’s a lot of booze
27. That’s a lot of booze
A corridor near the Tavern is lined with glass cases displaying a collection of more than 1,000 liquor bottles. Many were gifts to Broadmoor founder Spencer Penrose. The two oldest bottles are from 1801; the year with the most bottles, at 33, is 1906. There are several bottles with Penrose’s name on them, including two from a private trip he and wife Julie took down the Nile.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives. Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

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28. A friend of the military
28. A friend of the military
Broadmoor recreation areas, sports facilities and rooms were made available to military and their families at little or no cost during World War II. Officers who had no rooms at Camp (later Fort) Carson and Peterson Field (later Air Force Base) were housed at the hotel at reduced rates.
AP file photo.

AP

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29. What’s up with the ‘a’?
29. What’s up with the ‘a’?
The raised “a” in The Broadmoor’s name is the result of a copyright issue. The Broadmoor name was in use by the late 1800s, starting with Broadmoor Dairy in 1880, and thus was unusable. The issue was resolved by raising the “a” in Broadmoor, making the name unique and able to be copyrighted. Urban legend is more interesting, with a story that Broadmoor founder Spencer Penrose rode his horse into the lobby of the Antlers hotel, owned by Gen. William Palmer’s estate, and offered to purchase it. After he was refused, he raised the “a” as a putdown to the Antlers, or so the story goes.
Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

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30. Looking at The Broadmoor through camera lens
30. Looking at The Broadmoor through camera lens
Robert McIntyre became the official photographer for The Broadmoor in 1949. For more than 50 years, he photographed presidents, athletes and Hollywood celebrities at the hotel. His first celebrity photo was of radio newsman Lowell Thomas. McIntyre died in 2011. About 150 of his best-known photographs are displayed in Broadmoor West.
SOURCE: Broadmoor.com. Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

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