Save this content for laterSave this content on your device for later, even while offline Sign in with FacebookSign in with your Facebook account Close

Photos: Gallery | Colorado Springs Gazette, News

Fun facts from The Broadmoor's first 100 years - part 2

In the 100 days prior to The Broadmoor's 100th anniversary celebration, The Gazette is collecting 100 fun facts about the rich and colorful history of that landmark Colorado Springs institution. Here are Nos. 11-20.

11. ‘Phenomenal Snowman’ aided Ski Broadmoor

11. ‘Phenomenal Snowman’ aided Ski Broadmoor

Ski Broadmoor opened at the base of Cheyenne Mountain in 1959. It was the first ski area in the Rocky Mountain region to make artificial snow, using a $200,000 snow-making machine called the “Phenomenal Snowman.” With warm chinooks making it tough to maintain, Ski Broadmoor closed as a hotel operation in 1986. The city of Colorado Springs leased the area and ran it for two seasons, and then Vail leased it. It closed permanently in 1991. SOURCE: Broadmoor archives.
This February 1962 photo shows the view from inside Winter House at Ski Broadmoor. Myron Wood Collection, courtesy of Pikes Peak Library District, 002-754.

0
12. Honeymooning at The Broadmoor
12. Honeymooning at The Broadmoor
Famed actor Jimmy Stewart and Gloria Hatrick McLean honeymooned at The Broadmoor after their Aug. 9, 1949, wedding in Hollywood. Stewart’s new bride was no stranger at The Broadmoor; she had met her first husband, Edward McLean Jr., at a party there. Edward McLean also remarried — and also honeymooned at The Broadmoor.
SOURCE: “Broadmoor Memories” by Elena Bertozzi-Villa. Photo courtesy of The Broadmoor.

0
13. Penrose honored with special carnation
13. Penrose honored with special carnation
The Spencer Penrose Carnation, invented in Colorado Springs by William Hoyne, manager of The Broadmoor Greenhouse, was awarded a patent on Dec. 16, 1947. The new carnation, an unusual duo-tone magenta, was twice the size of ordinary varieties.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives

Margaretta M. Boas photograph collection, Courtesy of Pikes Peak Library District, 001-370

0
14. Flying bees at The Golden Bee
14. Flying bees at The Golden Bee
The Golden Bee, The Broadmoor’s English-style pub, opened in 1961, incorporating the interior of an actual 17th-century London pub. A renovation a few years ago more than doubled the pub’s space. The Golden Bee hands out about 100,000 dime-size, embroidered bee stickers to guests every year — usually by staff casually flinging the sticky bees onto patrons’ clothing. Before that tradition began, the accepted practice was to politely place stickers on guests’ lapels.
Gazette file photo.

Jeff Kearney

0
15. Presenting Miss Broadmoor: Pageant was held for decades
15. Presenting Miss Broadmoor: Pageant was held for decades
The first Miss Broadmoor bathing beauty contest was held Aug. 21, 1925, in conjunction with the grand opening of the public bathing beach on Cheyenne Lake. Twelve women competed, with Mary Graeff of Corpus Christi, Texas, judged “Most Beautiful Bather.” The contest continued until 1968.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives. Photo courtesy of The Broadmoor.

0
16. Clark Gable ‘drove the women wild’ at resort

16. Clark Gable ‘drove the women wild’ at resort

Movie star Clark Gable, as a first lieutenant serving at the Army Air Air Base in Pueblo in the 1940s, frequently visited The Broadmoor when he had overnight passes. He played golf, skated “and drove the women wild in the Hawaiian Village nightclub,” said “Broadmoor Memories” by Elena Bertozzi-Villa. Gable went on to earn the Air Medal and the Distinguished Flying Cross for his actions in World War II.

This AP file photo shows Gable in 1953. 

ASSOCIATED PRESS

0
17. Doors star attraction at CC homecoming at Broadmoor
17. Doors star attraction at CC homecoming at Broadmoor
On Oct. 21, 1967, The Doors played in The Broadmoor ballroom for the Colorado College homecoming. The band’s new hit “Light My Fire” was the highlight of the performance.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives

AP file photo.

ASSOCIATED PRESS

0
18. Sea lions created a stir at hotel
18. Sea lions created a stir at hotel
In the 1950s, The Broadmoor tried employing a pair of sea lions to eat excess goldfish in the lake. But it turned out they needed saltwater fish, so barrels of fish had to be flown in. Guests, meanwhile, complained about the noisy creatures, which also had a tendency to wander. One of the sea lions made it all the way to the front desk in the lobby one day, where it barked at arriving guests. The sea lions were eventually moved to the Cheyenne Mountain Zoo.
Source: Broadmoor archives. Photo courtesy of The Broadmoor

0
19: A sign of appreciation for comedian Jack Benny
19. A sign of appreciation for comedian Jack Benny
Comedian Jack Benny was a frequent guest and performer at The Broadmoor. During an appearance on “The Tonight Show,” the comedian was asked by Johnny Carson where he would spend the summer. He said he’d be performing at The Broadmoor, which he said he enjoyed even though the hotel didn’t pay him enough. When Benny arrived at the hotel, Russ Freymuth, then assistant manager, laid out a red carpet for him to show Benny he was appreciated symbolically, if not monetarily.
SOURCE: “Broadmoor Memories” by Elena Bertozzi-Villa. Photo courtesy The Broadmoor.

0
20. ‘Ice Castles’ filmed at Broadmoor
20. ‘Ice Castles’ filmed at Broadmoor
On April 4, 1978, the movie “Ice Castles,” starring Lynn-Holly Johnson, the 1974 U.S. novice ladies silver medalist, began filming at The Broadmoor World Arena. Several Broadmoor Skating Club members appeared in the film. In the movie, the character of Alexis “Lexie” Winston moves to Colorado Springs from her small hometown of Waverly, Iowa, to train.
SOURCE: Broadmoor archives, Gazette research. Photo courtesy Columbia Pictures.

0